BLACK BEARS sybils den
 
Welcome to Sybil's Den.  This site is meant for information purposes  on raising  pet exotics animals based on my experience.  There are care sheets for black bears, foxes, raccoons, emus, farm animals and domestic animals.   Also please find a very informative message board with a lot of great members.

For some of the species of animals I have or had information on, You will find their photo gallery.
BLACK BEARS




 
 

My Llamas, Past and Present
Page 2 of 3

Llama Photo Gallery
 
Starsky and Hutch
Starsky and Hutch were my first llamas.  both  of them were males.  I bought them early spring of 2000. 

They both got along fine, until they reached maturity, which is usually around 18 months. They have not been gelded, nor did they have their fighting teeth removed. Their fighting teeth could be dangerous with each other. When the fight, they will spit on each other.  Llamas don't generally spit on people. They could if they get really upset or feel threatened by a person. (Mine never did spit on me)

They would  fight amongst themselves. I can only assume due to maturity, food and another female llama (Becky)
Starsky and Hutch did not fight all the time, but, I did not have any separate pasture I could use to separate them.
To eliminate the fighting, I sold Hutch. I really did not want to do that, but, I had to think of their safety.

Starsky was a great llama.  He loved Sybil and use to play with her, or follow her around.

Sadly, Starsky passed away in 2009.  He sadly missed.

I can only guess the cause of his death was due to "Meningeal Worm" which is an intestinal worm.
This Meningeal worm is usually passed through a white-tailed deer.  But, it also could have been
something else.  I guess I will never know for sure.

 

 
BECKY (white and tan Llama)
Becky was the first female llama I got.  I bought her at an auction in  June 2000.

Becky was a very friendly llama.
She loved to be petted and even hugged. (which is unusual for a llama).

In 2004, I found Becky laying on her side, with her neck stretched out. At first, I thought she was dead, when I called her name, she look up at me, then I was relieved to see she was still alive.

After calling multiple vets, I couldn't get anyone to come and treat her. At that point, I didn't know what else to do. So I gave her about a cup of vegetable oil. This is generally given for bloat and sometimes constipation. but, bloat is rare llamas.

We would not give up on her, We tried everything we could think of.
After a day, I was concerned about dehydration, fortunately, I found a vet that would sell me a bag of IV.
Becky was then put on IV as instructed by the vet. 

In between all this, I still kept trying to find a vet to look at her. I called a "llama specialist" in ohio and they told me that, once a llama is down for two days, they will never get up.   But, Becky proved them wrong.


Every day, I would go out and rub her neck, back and would keep movement in her legs,  Four days later, Becky started  to try and pick her head up. so that's when I knew there could be hope after all. Then after about a week, she was able to hold her head up on her own, then she would start moving her body a little, I then started moving her legs, her body as much as I could, and just kept rubbing her neck, legs. The more I did this, the better she got.

Three weeks later,  my vet come out to check her, he then managed to get her to stand on her own. she could not stand long, but she was up. so the next day, we got a few of our friends and we each took a side and lifted her.. she stood again for a little longer..
everyday, thereafter I would make her stand till finally she could do it on her own. she would walk a few more steps each day.
Almost 5 weeks, she made a full recovery, and even had a few babies after that.

My point to this is, not to give up there is always could be some hope.

Sadly, Becky passed away in 2008. I am not sure what killed her.  I miss her, and found her to be a great pet.

 
JULIE ANN
Julie Ann is the only llama we have left.  Julie Ann is actually Becky's Grand daughter. 
Julie Ann was from Becky's first born llama.

Even though Julie Ann is our only llama, she is very happy. I generally do not like to have only one llama, because generally, they like to be with their own species.  However, Julie Ann is an exception.
Even when the other llamas alive, Julie Ann kept to herself.  She seems to enjoy Oscar (my steer) and my donkeys.  But, mostly, she likes people. 

Julie Ann is pretty spoiled, she prefers to be hand fed. She is also friendly, and enjoys being petted and enjoys people.  She is a great pet.

I have learned the hard way to make sure Julie Ann gets worm preventatives monthly. Fortunately, it is easy to administer to her. Ivomec is in a paste form, and since she likes to be hand fed, there is no problem taking her medicine.  
See more pictures of Julie Ann

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Julie Ann is the only llama we have left.  Julie Ann is actually Becky's Grand daughter. 
Julie Ann was from Becky's first born llama.

Even though Julie Ann is our only llama, she is very happy. I generally do not like to have only one llama, because generally, they like to be with their own species.  However, Julie Ann is an exception.
Even when the other llamas alive, Julie Ann kept to herself.  She seems to enjoy Oscar (my steer) and my donkeys.  But, mostly, she likes people. 

Julie Ann is pretty spoiled, she prefers to be hand fed. She is also friendly, and enjoys being petted and enjoys people.  She is a great pet.

I have learned the hard way to make sure Julie Ann gets worm preventatives monthly. Fortunately, it is easy to administer to her. Ivomec is in a paste form, and since she likes to be hand fed, there is no problem taking her medicine.  
See more pictures of Julie Ann

 

 

 

 

 

 

copyright  sybilsden.com