BLACK BEARS sybils den
 
Welcome to Sybil's Den.  This site is meant for information purposes  on raising  pet exotics animals based on my experience.  There are care sheets for black bears, foxes, raccoons, emus, farm animals and domestic animals.   Also please find a very informative message board with a lot of great members.

For some of the species of animals I have or had information on, You will find their photo gallery.
BLACK BEARS




 

F. A. Q   for  Red Fox Family and Arctic FOXES

Written by Pat (owner of Sybil's Den) http://sybilsden.com
(Edited by Juska (member of sybils message board)
(Juska's Tumbler link)   (Juska's Facebook Page)   (Juska's Etsy Shop

1.  DO YOU SELL FOXES?   WHERE CAN I BUY A FOX KIT?
DO YOU SELL FOXES? WHERE CAN I BUY A FOX KIT?
NO, I personally do not sell foxes or any other type of animal. The purpose of this website and message board is to help others learn more about foxes and other animals, based on my experience with them.

The following are reputable fox breeders that I highly recommend. Some will ship, but please make sure a fox is legal in your state/county/city/township and make sure you are fully aware of what to expect.
 
Indiana Ohio UK
Lost River Game Farm

Tiny Tracks

Hillview Exotics

Wess Exotic Animals

Wild Adventures
Flashman Foxes
 
2.  ARE FOXES LEGAL WHERE I LIVE?
The best way to find out for sure is to call your state DNR and ask for permits department.
Also, keep in mind, you will need to follow city, county, township regulations.
In other words: if your state allows a fox, your city/county/township might not. so please check there also.

All States and other countries have different laws.

Further reference, check here  http://sybilsden.com/reference/state-regs.htm
 
3.  I AM UNDER 18  STILL IN SCHOOL OR LIVE IN APARTMENT OR RENTAL PROPERTY, SHOULD I BUY A FOX?
I AM UNDER 18/STILL IN SCHOOL/LIVE IN APARTMENT OR RENTAL PROPERTY, SHOULD I BUY A FOX?

If you are under 18 years of age, most states will not give you a permit. It is unfair for the fox, because not only will you not be the legal owner of the animal in case something happens, you also do not know what your future holds beyond school. Where will you be in 5 years? 10 years? Before purchasing any animal, you should at least have a rough idea of this, because it is extremely likely that your animal will be alive for that period of time. And you will still be responsible for it, no matter what happens.

What happens if you go off to college? What are you going to do with your fox? Re-homing is not an option. Most foxes do not re-home easily and the process is extremely stressful. If you really and truly want a fox, wait until you know for sure you have the knowledge, and your own house.

It is not recommended to attempt to keep a fox in an apartment. It is unfair to the fox, and chances are that any potential landlord will not allow it. Anyone living near you will not be happy either. Foxes can be quite loud and you can expect to hear complaints about it.

When foxes are bored or unhappy, they can be very destructive. Their marking (especially on carpets) will stink up your apartment, ruin your carpet, furniture and walls. Some people have had foxes dig holes in the walls.

We recommend that Foxes should NOT be kept on rental properties of any sort, but should a person decide to try this, it should not be an apartment, they should be able to have an outdoor enclosure. If the fox is not on the lease, the landlord can later claim they didn't agree to the fox and have it forced out or evict the tenant. Also charge you for any damages they feel the fox did. Again, it is unfair for the fox to live in these conditions.

I do  not recommend owning a fox in a city where houses are very close. Chances are good, you will eventually have problems with neighbors. Keep in mind, many people seem to think that foxes belong in the wild and some neighbors can give you hard time owning a fox.  Also, keeping an adult fox in the house 24/7 stands a good chance of the fox escaping (not to mention the odor). Once a fox escapes, they are extremely difficult to get back.  
 
 
4.  I WANT A FOX, BECAUSE THEY'RE COOL. WHAT'S WRONG WITH THAT?
This is the wrong reason to buy a fox. Looks are a poor reason to want any pet. They are pretty, but there is a lot of work and understanding in raising a fox. They are nothing like dogs or cats. They need special care.

If you want to see a fox in person, check out zoos or wildlife refuges. Some have foxes. Quiet observation is often enough to satisfy the want to see an exotic animal. You may also be able to volunteer at a wildlife refuge that allows interns. This way you could interact with all kinds of exotic animals, without the stress and pressing responsibility of owning one full-time. Some states will actually require you do this in order to obtain a permit.
 
5   WHEN ARE KITS BORN?
Usually in the spring (March-April); they are generally ready to re-home in May.
They have kits once a year.
 

6.   WHAT IS THE BEST AGE TO BUY A FOX?

A good age would be 4-6 weeks. At this age, it is easier to work and bond with your fox. They don't generally develop fear until 3-5 months of age. 4 weeks is more ideal for getting a fox.

This is why it is very important to spend as much time as possible with your fox at a young age. Foxes are generally weaned by 4 weeks. At that age, you don't need to worry about bottle feeding a kit. Some breeders pull their kits around the age of 2-3 weeks of age. Some might not pull them at all. Either way, it is important that the kit has a lot of human contact from at least the breeder. Otherwise, you may have problems with the kit.
 
 

7.  SHOULD I BUY ONE OR TWO FOXES?

I suggest one if it is your first time owning one. This way, you can focus on bonding with your fox, especially if you've never had a fox before. If you decide you want a second, wait until the next year to get one.
 
 

8.  I WANT A FOX, BUT I HAVE A DOG, CAT OR OTHER ANIMAL(S). HOW CAN I DEAL WITH THAT?

When you first bring your fox kit home, give him/her a little time to adjust to its new environment first.
Once he/she feels comfortable, put the fox in a carrier/cage and let your dogs sniff the fox through the wire.
This could take anywhere from an hour to a couple of days. Do not let the fox get stressed.
Depending on your dogs' disposition, your dog should get used to the idea of having a fox in the family, assuming your dog is good natured, the fox will be happy to play with the dog.

Cats, for the most part, don't really care about foxes. However, with an adult fox, I do not recommend keeping a cat together with your fox. Your fox can kill your cat. Definitely never let a kitten near your fox, or even in view of it. That could mean instant death for the kitten.

Basically, anything else smaller than a fox is prey to them. It is a must that you keep any other type of animal away from your fox (rabbits, birds, reptiles etc).
 

9.  DO I NEED A VET FOR MY FOX?

Yes. Hopefully one that has some experience with foxes. A fox will need shots and checked for worms.
Having the fox spayed or neutered will help a little with the urine odor, though don't expect this to eliminate marking or urine odor. It only lessens a little. It also might help any behavior change throughout the year. A good age would be about 6 months to have your fox fixed.

Prior to buying your fox, you must find a vet first who will treat your fox. It won't hurt to find as many vets as you can that will treat a fox.

Here is a list of  some vets:
http://sybilsden.com/reference/vets.htm
 
 

10.  IS IT OK TO PLAY BITE WITH MY FOX?

No. This will only encourage him/her to bite you. Use a toy to play bite with your fox, not your hand.
 

11.  ARE FOXES EASY TO CARE FOR?

No. It is a MUST that you understand a fox's needs and their behavior. Do as much research as possible.

Feel free to join my message board here: http://sybilsden.com/bb/

There are many fox owners here that can give you more information based on their experience. It is a very open community and questions are quite welcome. We strive to educate people about exotics and provide our knowledge to any curious potential exotic-pet owner.
 

12. DO FOXES STINK?

Mostly it is their urine that smells. Foxes will mark (which means they will randomly urinate at spots). Keep in mind spaying or neutering will not stop a fox from marking. Having a fox fixed will help very little as far as the urine odor.

Their fur is not the issue, it is their urine. Keeping an adult fox in your house 24/7 will ruin your carpets over time. The odor is extremely difficult to remove. The whole room will, in time, smell.  
 

13. SHOULD I HAVE MY FOX DE-SCENTED,  DE-FANGED OR DE-CLAWED?

Definitely NOT

De-SCENTING (removal of the glands):
This will NOT eliminate the urine odor. De-scenting is a very dangerous procedure on foxes and serves no purpose. You could stand a chance of losing the fox if something goes wrong. If you are even thinking about de-scenting, a fox is not for you. This procedure is not at all the same as de-scenting a skunk. It is a totally different procedure. If anyone tells you differently they are, quite frankly, incorrect.

DE-FANGING:
This is a very dangerous procedure, and could break the fox's jaw. There is NO need to have this done.
If you think this procedure will help, you are wrong. If a fox is raised properly, it won't bite, like some would think.

DECLAWING:
There is no need to declaw a fox, or any other animal. Fox claws are not retractable, and not having them will cause problems for the fox. Foxes don't scratch people; their claws are NOT dangerous and there is no need to have this done.

It is cruel and serves no purpose. When you declaw an animal, the surgery removes everything up to the first “finger” bone. It's like cutting the ends of your fingers and toes off to keep your fingernails from growing. Absolutely no practical use whatsoever, and in doing so you are crippling your animal.

 
If you feel the need for any of the above, then it is apparent that you need to do more research on foxes, and have a better understanding before buying one. All of these practices are very much looked down upon in the exotic pet community. Breeders may refuse to sell to you if you mention doing any of these things to their babies.
 

14. DO I NEED A PEN/ENCLOSURE FOR MY FOX?

Yes, you should have a pen for your fox. Most foxes love to be outdoors. However, they do like to be with their owners too. It is okay to let them in your house, though not 24/7. You could also take him/her for walks, but I still recommend a pen. Some states require that you build one before acquiring a permit for a fox. They may also need to be inspected on a regular basis.
 
 

15.  SHOULD I TAKE MY FOX FOR A WALK IN PUBLIC PLACES?

No. It is okay to walk your fox on your property. The less people who see him/her the better. Keep in mind, there are many people out there that think domestic-bred foxes are “wild animals”, and they seem to think they belong in wild, even though they have no natural instinct to hunt and would most likely die. Therefore, you should expect someone to report you, even if your fox is legal. Do you want the hassle, just to walk your fox in public? The less people know you have a fox - even though you know he/she is completely legal to own and not “wild” - the better. Some people can be vindictive. They may try to poison or kill your fox. So it is best to play it safe.

If there are frequent complaints, you stand the chance of losing your fox by the state. Also, if your fox nips or bites someone, and the person reports you, you lose your fox. Exotics who bite are confiscated and then tested for rabies, which involves euthanization to examine brain tissue. Your pet will be killed if it ever bites someone. This is an unfortunate fact.

This is the other reason is most states and/or townships or cities do not allow/condone a fox to be in public. By doing so, you stand a good chance of having the fox confiscated, possibly killed and fined. It is best to be safe than sorry.
 
 

16. WHAT TYPE AND SIZE PEN DOES A FOX NEED?

The bigger you make it, the better. “Chicken wire” alone will not work.
Chain link or similar is the best type of fencing to use. You can put chicken wire on the outside of the chain link. This is more of a safely issue. If the fox is small, it could fit is head through chain link, and possibly get it stuck. I have personally heard of this happening. However, if the fox is full grown, it should not be an issue. But chicken wire will help prevent anything small getting into the pen, like kittens, chickens, etc.

It is a must to have fencing on the bottom and top of your pen. Without a bottom, the fox will dig its way out. Without the top, you stand a chance of the fox climbing. If possible, dig a foot or two down, then lay the fence and connect the sides. Then put dirt over the bottom fence to make a dirt “floor”. You can also put straw or wood chips over  the bottom fence.  Wood chips seem to work the best, but is more expensive.

The bare minimum size pen would be 10Lx10Wx6H. This is assuming you can set it up with lots of shelves, hiding places and a lot of enrichment. I personally would suggest at least a 10x20 or larger. Never plan on leaving an adult fox in a dog cage in lieu of a pen. This is asking for problems.

However, keep in mind that as a kit, you kept the kit in a large dog crate indoors, and let loose when supervised. Living indoors, of course, allows the person to bond closely with their fox (which is crucial) while it is still young. Also, a kit will escape from chain link. A fox kit generally won't mark when a kit. They might start marking around 4-6 months. You can put him/her in the outdoor pen when it is almost full grown.

When keeping a fox kit in a dog crate, keep their litter pan, food and water in it. Make sure the kit always has access to their litter pan. Also, you should include a small cardboard box with a little blanket in it for them to sleep in. Put a blanket or sheet over a little less than half the cage mostly where their sleep box is to make they are more comfortable and feel secure. When you have the kit lose in your house, make sure you have litter boxes where the kit is.
 

17. WHAT SHOULD I PUT IN A FOX'S PEN? 

Shelves and hiding places for them. Foxes like to sit high up sometimes. Also, some states require shelves in a foxes pen.
Some ideas would be a toddler playground equipment. You can find used ones on Craigslist, eBay or at yard sales.  Durable dog toys also make good fox toys.

You can hide some treats throughout their pen and/or put some in a wide mouth jug or brown lunch bags for them to work at getting. This provides enrichment for your fox.

 

18. CAN FOXES BE LITTER TRAINED?

Yes, but some may take longer than others. It is not necessary to put a lot of litter in the litter box. By doing so it will only encourage the fox to bury their food there. You should also have a litter box or two in their pen. If you don't have a roof on their pen, the litter pan should be covered to prevent it from getting wet.
 
 

19. HOW DO I LITTER TRAIN A FOX?

It is very helpful if you start from day one. Assuming your fox is a young kit, you can start out with a small box with litter. Keep a litter box or two wherever you have your fox. Every hour or two, place the fox in the litter box. If the fox kit defecates or urinates outside the box, pick up the stool and place it in the box. If they urinate, soak a little on a paper towel and place in the litter box. You must be consistent. Only with consistency will the fox learn that their waste should go in the box.

When my foxes were kits, I kept them in a very large dog crate at night. I kept a small litter pan, water, food and toys. Also had a small box for the kit to sleep in. I kept a blanket over half the cage to help them feel secure.  During the day and/or when I was home, they did not stay in cage, but did have access to it.

As the kit gets older, and you find the fox is not going all the way in the litter box, then try a bigger litter box.  I use black cement mixing pans for litter boxes. You can also try a very large hooded cat litter box, but the cement pans are cheaper. Line the litter box with newspaper first, then put the litter over the newspaper for easy cleanup. You can also get some 4x4 cardboard sheets to place under the litter box. Sometimes foxes will go outside the box. You can get the cardboard sheets at many stores for free; just ask if they have any.

You can sprinkle a little cat deodorizer or baking soda on top of the litter. Never spray the litter with any other cleaning products or air fresheners. However, when you clean the pans, you can spray the bottom of the pan with a mix of odor destroyer, vinegar and dish soap. Let it dry, then line the pan with newspaper and apply your litter. A mix of vinegar, water and dish soap helps deter flies.

 
 

20.  HOW OFTEN SHOULD I CLEAN A FOX'S LITTER BOX, AND WHAT TYPE OF LITTER SHOULD I USE?

You can use almost any type of litter. I personally use "Paws & Claws kitty litter" from Tractor Supply" brand, which I found to be the cheapest. It is $2.99 for a 30lb bag.

Sometimes I use "Tidy Cats". Remember, you don't need to fill the box with a lot of litter. Also line the litter pan with newspaper for a little easier cleaning. Once the new litter is changed, I sprinkle a little bit of "Arm & Hammer Cat Litter Deodorizer".

The litter box should be cleaned once a day. You can scoop in between. If scooping keeps the litter box clean, then you can change every other day. I personally have to clean their litter pans everyday. Keep in mind, I have 3 foxes and 3 raccoons. (I have 7 big litter pans). If the litter pan is too dirty, the fox might be more inclined not to use it.
 
 

21. MY FOXES URINATES OR DEFECATES  IN HIS/HER FOOD AND WATER DISH. WHAT SHOULD I DO?

Foxes will mark in their food, water dish or any thing they want to claim. This includes your possessions too!

Place the food and water dish in a box, where they can reach their head in but not their whole body.
I personally use a stainless small bucket for their water. They can reach the water, but is harder for them to mark in. Other options would be to use a five gallon bucket with small holes cut in the side (just large enough for the fox to comfortably fit its head into).
 
 

22. ARE FOXES THIEVES?

Yes; they will steal certain things like shoes, gloves or anything leather. Especially leather. They will destroy anything that is leather.
 
 

23. DO FOXES BITE?

Yes. However, if raised properly and understand the proper training, then the answer is no. They generally don't bite.

On another note, a fox can sometimes attempt to bite for reasons we might not understand, just like a dog or cat. This is another reason to never play bite with a kit or adult fox. You can use a stuffed animal or other toy, but never your hand or other body parts.
 

24 IS IT OK TO LET MY FRIENDS PLAY WITH MY FOX?

No. It is best to not let friends play with your fox. One reason is that your friend may not understand foxes. The fox will then be more inclined to bite them. If someone gets bitten, even if you are close friends, you stand the chance of losing your fox. Never force your fox to be around a lot of people. Most foxes do not adapt with a lot of new people.
 

25. ARE THERE ANY FOXES THAT DON'T SMELL AS BAD AS REDS AND ARCTIC'S, OR BE KEPT INDOORS?

Yes. I have heard Swifts, Grays or Corsac foxes are easier to handle and that their urine doesn't smell as strong. However, Corsacs can be pretty vocal, and at this time they are not available in the United States.

Fennec foxes can be kept indoors. Though what I have learned from Fennec fox owners is they make a very loud screeching noise when they are excited. Fennec foxes generally do not litter train. They also will urinate in their bed and anywhere in the house.
 

26.  WHAT SHOULD I FEED MY FOX?

Everyone has their own methods and recipes. Some feed raw meat. If you have an interest in complete raw meat then check on the message board for some fox owners that do feed raw. However, my preference is cooked chicken/turkey. Once in a while I will give them a piece of raw chicken/turkey or a wing, leg or a sometimes a small whole raw chicken. When available, I will feed a little bit of raw deer meat with the bones.

Like cats and ferrets, foxes also need taurine in their diet. Chicken or turkey giblets usually have this. I feed mine raw giblets (hearts, liver). This is not meant to be their main diet, though. Canned cat food has taurine. I also feed mine a small amount of canned cat food. They don't get this every day. It depends on what I feed them that day.

For an example, for my 3 raccoons and 3 foxes, I use one can of can cat food for all 6 animals, then mix it in their grain-free dog food . I then add their chicken or turkey along with a little bit of chicken gizzards.
 

My foxes' diet:

A mix of boiled chicken or turkey and veggies (not overcooked).
Small kibble grain-free dog food and/or cat food (not recommend for as a main source).

I mix this together and add a little olive oil along with small amount of chicken/turkey giblets.
Beef liver (when available), Deer meat (when available)

I personally don't recommend beef. A little once in while should not hurt, but I don't think it is good as a daily diet.

For treats, they get raw eggs, which they love. Dehydrated chicken as well (which they also love).
a little bit of marshmallows. Sometimes they will eat them, sometimes just cache (save them for later/hide) them.

You could try giving them some fruit and veggies; mine won't eat any of it without being mixed in their food (described above). However, some foxes do eat fruits and veggies.

I just recently bought a meat grinder. I have found this to be very helpful. I cook the chicken or turkey first, which helps soften the bones to grind. I will grind the meat and small bones in the grinder, then add carrots in the grinder.  I try and make large batches of this, and freeze or refrigerate (depends on the amount I make). I then just mix this together with the rest of their food, mentioned above.

PLEASE NOTE: The above is what I feed my foxes. There are other diets from other fox owners. Some raw, some not. Every one has their own recipes. The most important is the foxes get the proper diet. I DO NOT recommend feeding dry cat or dog food as their only source of food.

If you prefer to feed a raw diet, here is a great site that pertains to feeding raw meat.
 http://www.thepetfox.net/2010/08/fox-food-recipe-maintenance-diet.html

 

27. WHAT SHOULD I DO TO FOX-PROOF MY HOUSE?

First of all, it is important the fox doesn't get bored. Most foxes should not be kept in a house 24/7. By doing so, they will become bored which will encourage destruction. However, keep in mind that as a kit, he/she should be kept in your house.

When an adult fox is in your house, you should try and keep the fox out of the kitchen. This would depend on what you have in your kitchen. If you have dog or cat bowls (water or food), even empty, they will be more apt to mark in those bowls. If there are any bags or anything on the counter, they might mark those too.

For the other rooms, make sure you have anything leather, clothing or shoes inaccessible to the fox. All foxes are different, and some might be worse than others.

My first fox would mark and steal everything. She would mark lamps and anything else on a table or counter. She would steal shoes, gloves, clothes and destroy them. The three I have now are not near as bad as my first one. I have learned more since the first one. The first fox had access to the whole house. She had a pen, but it was not as big as the one I now have.

Some fox owners say their foxes have put holes in their wall. If this happens, it is obvious that the fox is bored. Foxes are very high energy animals, therefore they need a lot of room to roam and a lot of activity. However, the older they get, the calmer they get (don't expect miracles though). A lot depends on their activity.

If you have carpets, you can put the 4x4 cardboard sheets down. You still need to worry about your furniture. Keep covers on them. Clean anytime you see where the fox marks. Otherwise they will be encouraged to mark more often.

As they get older, some seem to lessen a little with marking. When I have my foxes in the house, I try and watch them. As soon as I see them attempting to mark, I tell them "no" in a stern voice. They seem to understand. But of course there are times when I do not always see it. I don't have carpet, so it is easier to keep control of the odor.

Please keep in mind, when your fox is in your house, you must be very cautious when you or a member of the family open an outside door.  Foxes are quick and can easily escape.
 
 

28. WILL A FOX SLEEP IN A BED LIKE A CAT OR DOG?

Foxes are not like a cat or dog. However, a fox will sleep in your bed, but don't expect it to cuddle with you like a cat or dog would. Foxes are not really affectionate animals. Keep in mind, if you have your fox sleeping with you at night, chances are good the fox might get up during the night and get into trouble. It may also mark you and your bed if you allow him/her to sleep there.
 
 

29. DOES A FOX LIKE TO CUDDLE OR BE HELD?

No, they generally do not like cuddle or be held. Some foxes will let you hold, assuming this was started as a kit. They generally don't like to be held for very long. Don't force the fox to be held for a long period of time.
 

30. IS THERE ANYTHING THAT IS TOXIC TO FOXES?

Yes, do not feed the following:
 
*Chocolate of any kind *Anything with caffeine *Onions *garlic *grapes *raisins
*macadamia nuts * products that contains cocoa beans or hulls *raw salmon
 

31. WHAT SHOTS SHOULD A FOX GET?

Distemper
Rabies (killed virus)
Parvovirus (could depend on your area, or if you walk your fox)
Lyme Disease (depends on your area, or if you walk your fox)

Keep in mind, if a fox is penned up, there is less chance of rabies. Usually, rabies only occurs when the animal is bitten by a rabid animal or feeds from the carcass of a dead animal who was infected. Other diseases may be contracted if taking your fox for a walk.

Contrary to popular belief, foxes/raccoons/skunks are not “born” with the rabies virus nor do captive bred specimens rarely ever come into contact with any of these.

However, keep in mind if your fox has a rabies shot (which is great if you do) but, unfortunately  rabbie shots is not really approved. In other words, if your fox was to bite someone, and is reported or needs to medical attention, the fox still will most likely put down.


 

 

32.  I WANT TO BREED AND SELL FOXES. WHAT IS REQUIRED?

First, you must have a lot of experience with foxes to breed them. Most states require a special permit for this, along with a USDA permit. These can be very hard to obtain and take years of experience to get.

If you want to breed foxes or any other pet animal for the money, forget it. You certainly will not come far ahead on breeding foxes. Keep in mind, there is a good chance you might not sell all the kits. Then what would you do with the kits you don't sell?
 

33. ARE FOXES NOCTURNAL?

Yes and no. In the wild, they are mostly nocturnal. In captivity, not as much. A lot has to do with when and how long the owner spends time with the fox. Foxes will take "cat naps" during the day. Mine do.

They love laying in the sun on their shelf or in their tower. However, mine seem to be more active in the late afternoon to the early or mid evening.
 

34. SHOULD I BATHE OR GROOM MY FOX?

It is not necessary to bathe a fox. Foxes generally take care of their own grooming. Though, in the early spring most foxes will begin to shed. If you start brushing your fox as a kit, he/she will get used to it as an adult. However, the adult fox might not want to stay still long enough for you to brush it out. I personally use a stainless steel dog comb on mine.  They seem to really enjoy the comb.  The new coat should be grown in by early fall.

Some foxes will shed and end up with large mats. Foxes usually can pull them out on their own. My one fox sheds in this manner. I don't use a brush. I watched my female fox groom the foxes and even dogs. She takes her teeth to the skin and zigzags up. I tried this on the fox that sheds in clumps, and he will sit for a lot longer than he would with a brush. Of course I used my finger nails to do this. If the mats are really bad, you can cut some of them with scissors. I have seen a fox owner shave her fox down to rid it of the mats. But most foxes will not allow noisy clippers near them.
 

35. WHAT SHOULD I USE TO PREVENT/RID MY FOX OF FLEAS AND TICKS?

If you have a problem with fleas or ticks, you can use Frontline Plus or Revolution. Usually the dose for puppies works best.

Do not use flea collars or any generic flea prevention.
 

This Article was written by Pat (owner of Sybil's Den) http://sybilsden.com

Edited by Juska  (member of sybils message board)
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