Page 1 of 1

Binturongs

Posted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 12:04 pm
by Ash
So binturongs have been a big interest of mine over the years. I've just been taking a look at them again, just because I like them. :)

Anybody know what types of temperatures they can be out in? I know they're from tropical climates, but I have seen pictures of them in the snow too, but only in captivity. It would be nice to know if they could be outdoors all year-round. I think they can, and it sure would make it easier to keep them if they could withstand cold winters.

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 3:04 pm
by TamanduaGirl

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 11:54 pm
by Ash
Ahah. Should have checked that out first, lol. Thank-you.

It doesn't mention temperature extremes, but it says anything less than 49 degrees should have a place to dry off. Having a heated shed or something like that during the winter would be best too. If I ever were to get one, I wouldn't have to worry about too much humidity. It's extremely dry in Utah, even during the winters.

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 1:48 am
by TamanduaGirl
Um did you read 1.1 temperature and humidity, specifically the temperature section?

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 3:48 am
by Ash
TamanduaGirl wrote:Um did you read 1.1 temperature and humidity, specifically the temperature section?


lol Nope. But I did now. :red-face: :lol: Sometimes I skim too fast.

So they would definitely need an indoor enclosure of some kind. That makes them a lot more difficult to house. What would be cool would be to have an enclosure that was partly enclosed and then had a large outside run. In the summer a bint could have access to both indoor and outdoor, and in the winter, you keep them in the indoor part where it's nice and warm.

That makes me feel bad for the ones I saw in the ad a while back. It was a pair of them, and they were being kept outside in the middle of winter and snow was in their enclosure. Hope their toes and tails didn't get frostbitten.

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 1:19 pm
by TamanduaGirl
Yeah in and outdoor is what most do for sensitive animals like that then lock them in on days where there is frost and at night when there is any risk of cold weather.

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 4:49 pm
by Ash
Is that what Chasing-tail does with her binturongs, do you know? Or does she not get snow in her area?

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 6:01 pm
by TamanduaGirl
She get a bit more snow than we do here but like here it doesn't stick around very long if at all.

Yeah she has buildings with heats for them, tamanduas, etc plus outdoor enclosures for them to use as well that they can be blocked off from when it's too cold.

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 6:26 am
by Elina
The guy over here that I know who breeds them has an enclosure with a heated inside area so they can go out in all weather but they always have the option to go inside in the warm.

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 3:58 pm
by TamanduaGirl
One thing to consider though is providing heat and still letting them out when it's real cold like frosty or snow/ice is it increases the incidence of frost bite due to the extreme difference in temps.

Re: Binturongs

Posted: Sun May 24, 2015 1:02 pm
by TexasYankee
Just wanted to note that I was looking at the Wikipedia page on binturongs and discovered that when anti-exotic propaganda meets Wikipedia's cautious and non-confrontational editors, the results can be amusing.

Wikipedia wrote:However, its occasional ill-temperament makes it a difficult pet at best and it is better handled by experienced wildlife handlers and zookeepers.[28][not in citation given]


The citation given is this PDF file by a Malaysian professor and some of his students, which states that binturongs make excellent pets.

Prof. Madya Dr. Ahmad Hj. Ismail and students wrote:Most hand-raised binturongs believe themselves to be lap-pets. Many will begin grooming their humans after the greeting. This may involve flea hunting on heads or arms, nose nibbling, ear snuffling, and general poking about into pockets or shoes, if allowed. With their amazing sense of smell, most can smell a pocket that once held a marshmallow treat at five paces. They are adept at eating while hanging upside down, also, tilting their heads so as to not lose fruit juices.

Aggressive adult behavior is not especially common toward humans


Sadly, Wikipedia appears to have no "citation says the exact opposite" template.