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new llama

Llamas, Alpacas, Camels, Guanaco, Vicuña

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dobe627
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Seven Valleys,PA

new llama

Postby dobe627 » Tue May 22, 2007 7:38 pm

I am so happy, I have wanted a llama for over a year and on sunday I brought my little guy home. He's the sweetest and cutest little llama. Hes a seal bay, 5 months old. I got him from a lady who has bred, raised and shown for over 20 years. But he was her last baby as she is getting out of the business due to age. I have done alot of research online and thru books but will take any helpful hints. He has all his shots and is due for his worming which she said she always does at 6 months. I know alot of people say to get them older but she has been doing it this way for along time and says she has never had a problem. He's eating fine and doing great. Although the goats don't seem to like him much. The horses really don't seem to care. He will be pet as well as a guardian for the goats. I took some pictures and will post them soon.
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cow-doc
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Postby cow-doc » Wed May 23, 2007 9:55 pm

ivomec every 4-6 weeks for meningeal worm, esp in your part of the country.

shear in early/mid spring to avoid heat stress/stroke

work on haltering/leading/foot handling

recommend castration at some point

have fun with him!
"I never saw a wild thing feel sorry for itself. A small bird can fall frozen from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself."
dobe627
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Seven Valleys,PA

Postby dobe627 » Thu May 24, 2007 9:25 am

Thanks for the tips. Hes already halter broke, the breeder did that. but twice a day I take him for a walk so he gets used to being led and handled. Hes doing great with it. The vet said he doesn't recommend castrating till 1 year for musco-skelatal development. I have read conflicting storied on this, so will play it by ear. So far though his testicles haven't dropped. Thanks again.
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flawlesserr
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Location: forest, va

Postby flawlesserr » Thu May 24, 2007 6:44 pm

If you are going to get him castrated, I think you should wait until he's two.

Some people believe in berzerk llama syndrome, some don't... however, it's best not to treat him too much like a pet right now. They tend to imprint on humans and he can become aggressive later on. However, if you are getting him castrated, that should help.

We did worming once a month, and alternated between panacure and ivermectin.

I'm interested in knowing who you got him from! What is the name of the farm?

Can't wait for pictures!! :) I'm sure he's gorgeous!
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cow-doc
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Postby cow-doc » Thu May 24, 2007 10:16 pm

I had mine done between 18 and 24 months of age. Much later and they get their fighting teeth in and those have to be wired down.

Berserk syndrome is a real phenomenon. Just ask the llama rescue in NC where she has a herd of about 30 of them that have broken people's ribs and will attack you if you turn your back. You just have to let him learn to be a llama and not invade your space.

The panacur is fine for intestinal worms but you need ivomec for the meningeal worm, and that is usually done every 4-6 weeks.
"I never saw a wild thing feel sorry for itself. A small bird can fall frozen from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself."
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flawlesserr
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Postby flawlesserr » Fri May 25, 2007 3:21 am

I don't disagree that Berserk Llama Syndrome is real... however, the vet that sees the llamas I work with doesn't believe it is. She is adamently against admitting to it and had no problem when we had to bottle feed a baby male :/ Of course, we were careful not to interact with him too much (aside from when we had to) and he was able to spend most of his time with the herd (his mother wasn't producing milk for him). We also never let him treat us as playmates or enter into our personal space on his own terms.

He's two now, and he's a spoiled brat. He's not pushy with people so that's very good.

However, there's another llama (3-4 year old male, castrated at 2years) who will totally invade your personal space. He's pushy and bossy however he's never done anything more than bump into people. That was one of the reasons he was castrated (for fear he might become aggressive later on) I don't think he was coddled that much when he was younger, but he was worked with (he was originally brought to shows and handled/trained early on)

Most all hoofed male animals will develop some form of berserk syndrome if they are imprinted on at an early age by humans. It was shown that bulls who are raised by humans are mean/aggressive animals whereas those who aren't raised around humans are more likely to avoid/ignore humans.
sueBear
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Postby sueBear » Fri May 25, 2007 1:59 pm

Horses arent that way... but then again you can take a wild mustang three of four years old and tame it up almost to the same level as a horse imprinted on at an early age.
dobe627
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Seven Valleys,PA

Postby dobe627 » Sun May 27, 2007 12:48 pm

"Trace" came from " Gray's Llamas" in Port royal,PA. Its north of Harrisburg. I only spent the first few days spending more time with him. Now he's led to pasture in the morning and back in in the evening. I check on him from a distance during the day. The goats are doing alot better with him. Although he shows more interest in the horses. Their pastures are next to each other. And suebear you where saying about mustangs. Well one of mine is a 2 1/2 year old mustang I adopted through BLM when he was 1 and he's just as sweet as my 6 year old appaloosa that was around people all her life. But he gets daily handling as well. Anyway thanks for all your suggestions. He will without a doubt be getting the ivermectin on a regular basis. We have alot of deer in our woods.

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