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what is the easiest exotic cat to own?

Bobcats, servals, lynx, margay, anything smaller than a cheetah

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Nìmwey
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Re: what is the easiest exotic cat to own?

Postby Nìmwey » Sun Jul 30, 2017 3:56 pm

I hate to be boring, but I doubt getting an F2 is a good idea if you have no previous experience with wild and/or hybrid cats.
So get some "transition" animals, like a purebred Bengal (low content Asian leopard cat hybrid), or work with some wild cats/hybrids at some facility somewhere, to get experience.

At least I know it's like this in the wolfdog world. You don't jump from owning golden retrievers or no dog at all, to a mid-content wolfdog, or even a wolf. You go to northern and primitive breeds, to low-content wolfdog, to mid-and-high-content wolfdogs, and so on.
My main interest is in parrots, dogs, toothed whales and snakes.
Future animals I want to have when we have land are camels, wolfdogs/wolves, coyotes or jackals, striped hyena or aardwolf. Also poultry, rabbits water buffalo and/or yak for livestock.
snowfamily
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Re: what is the easiest exotic cat to own?

Postby snowfamily » Fri Feb 16, 2018 11:05 pm

My step kids and their mom are worried about our plans to get a bobcat cub.They think that our new baby could "turn on us" like many wild animals can. I have never heard of a bobcat attacking anyone. Any ideas on how to calm their fears?
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Ash
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Re: what is the easiest exotic cat to own?

Postby Ash » Sat Feb 17, 2018 12:36 am

The best thing to do is to be realistic about it with them. There are indeed dangers to owning any exotic cat, even the small ones. So a bobcat attack--although probably very unlikely--is still plausible.

They can be sweet animals, and when raised right will be that way most of the time. They can sometimes get possessive over their things, so it's very important to be able to read their cues and to respect them. If you have young children who can't read the bobcat well, then it could potentially be a dangerous situation. But if you have kids who are respectful and capable of reading body language, then it would likely be fine.

While it's great to see all the pros, it's good to understand that there are cons to it. For example, while my foxes are sweet and cuddly, I would still never trust them around a baby. Nor would I ever recommend anyone else's foxes be let around a baby.

Fortunately bobcats are said to be pretty transparent about their moods, so that makes things easier.

So while I would address all the good things captive bobcats have to offer, I would not deny that there is a risk in owning them as there is with any exotic.
3 red fox, 4 pectinata iguanas, nile monitor, BW tegu, sailfin dragon, leachie gecko, 6 snakes, 2 salamanders, 3 tarantulas
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hecate
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Re: what is the easiest exotic cat to own?

Postby hecate » Sun Feb 18, 2018 9:19 am

Even "domestic" cats can do a lot of damage if handled improperly and/or unsocialized. Wild animals don't "turn on" people, they simply act like the wild animals they are. You can never, ever forget to respect the animal, and never, ever forget that their reflexes and reactions are different than those of an animal selected over thousands of years to better tolerate human carelessness.

Bobcats are the longest-lived felid, the record is a little over 31 years. A bobcat is a committment for potentially a very long time. Felids do not take rehoming well, so if things don't work out it will likely mean the animal's death.

The kids' ages and maturity levels are a major consideration. If they are too young or too irresponsible to maintain the necessary handling and management protocols (don't bother them when they're eating, at least one physical barrier between the animal and the great outdoors at all times, close the door/gate and then shake it to make sure it latched, yada, yada), then a bobcat may be a poor choice at this time. And that goes for any friends they might bring home as well.

None of us can ever forget that any mistake we make that attracts public scrutiny affects and reflects on not only ourselves and our animals, but every other exotic owner, everywhere.
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GitaBooks
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Re: what is the easiest exotic cat to own?

Postby GitaBooks » Sun Feb 18, 2018 2:51 pm

hecate wrote:Even "domestic" cats can do a lot of damage if handled improperly and/or unsocialized. Wild animals don't "turn on" people, they simply act like the wild animals they are. You can never, ever forget to respect the animal, and never, ever forget that their reflexes and reactions are different than those of an animal selected over thousands of years to better tolerate human carelessness.

Bobcats are the longest-lived felid, the record is a little over 31 years. A bobcat is a committment for potentially a very long time. Felids do not take rehoming well, so if things don't work out it will likely mean the animal's death.

The kids' ages and maturity levels are a major consideration. If they are too young or too irresponsible to maintain the necessary handling and management protocols (don't bother them when they're eating, at least one physical barrier between the animal and the great outdoors at all times, close the door/gate and then shake it to make sure it latched, yada, yada), then a bobcat may be a poor choice at this time. And that goes for any friends they might bring home as well.

None of us can ever forget that any mistake we make that attracts public scrutiny affects and reflects on not only ourselves and our animals, but every other exotic owner, everywhere.


I totally agree. We hand-raised an orphaned domestic kitten and he is a real mean cat at times! Biting, scratching, doesn't like to be held or touched and prefers to spend most of his time outdoors or by himself. Every once in a while he asks for cuddles and is a big baby, but a few minutes of this and he is biting and scratching to be done.
Its almost more of an individual thing when it comes to cats rather than how they are raised or what species they are.

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