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The Migratory Bird Treaty Act confuses me. Help!

Hawks, Eagles, Owls, Osprey etc.

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Jabuticaba
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The Migratory Bird Treaty Act confuses me. Help!

Postby Jabuticaba » Thu Oct 18, 2012 9:18 pm

Hey, I have a question that's been bothering the heck out of me. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act prevents Americans from owning migratory birds, like the barn owl. But I know for a fact that people have owls for pets anyway, how is this possible? Is there something I'm missing?

I'm asking this question because a friend of mine is in love with the barn owl, and when we found out about this act, it upset her, as well as confuse the both of us. Why do people have owls as pets when it's supposedly illegal to even have their feathers?

:shrug: I honestly don't understand.
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TamanduaGirl
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Re: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act confuses me. Help!

Postby TamanduaGirl » Thu Oct 18, 2012 10:00 pm

You can have exotic owls, any bird not on the list.

Otherwise it's illegal without the federal permit, or a falconry permit.
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Re: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act confuses me. Help!

Postby Splashstorm » Fri Oct 19, 2012 3:20 pm

Yeah, that goes for almost every other bird on that list, like hummingbirds, crows, etc. As long as they're from other countries it's okay.
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Re: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act confuses me. Help!

Postby AzureWolf » Mon Jul 07, 2014 10:00 pm

Falconry permit would be the way you would want to go if you want to bond and enjoy the companionship of a bird of prey. non-native falls to state regulations regarding exotics. As has been stated, all native birds of prey and other migratory birds are protected and can not be "owned" as a pet.

If you are planning on Falconry, you would have to file your permit paper, then pass your examination with an 80% or better. Once this is done you will have to be sponsored by someone holding a Master class permit. an Apprentice class permit allowing you to keep and maintain 1(per 12-months) of either three types of small bird of prey: American Kestrel, Red-tailed Hawk, or Red-shouldered Hawk.


After practicing with your Apprentice class permit for 2 years then you can obtain a general class permit, allowing you to possess up to three birds of prey of any species that is not on the threatened or endangered list.
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Re: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act confuses me. Help!

Postby Alynn » Mon Jul 07, 2014 10:59 pm

You might have seen videos of pet barn owls, and they usually would be located in the UK (where they are legal), or they're actually at a licensed facility, or being used by a licensed falconer.

Also, like TamanduaGirl mentioned, exotic species of owl are legal but any native species in the US aren't permitted. For example, the Eurasian eagle owl seems to be an owl of choice for people who do get them, as they are very similar in appearance to the Great Horned owl, but is not native to the US like the Great horned owl is and is therefore legal to own without licensing(on a federal level anyway, a state/county/city might still ban the possession of an owl)
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BlueBaby1023
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Re: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act confuses me. Help!

Postby BlueBaby1023 » Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:19 pm

DaddyMisfit wrote:Falconry permit would be the way you would want to go if you want to bond and enjoy the companionship of a bird of prey. non-native falls to state regulations regarding exotics. As has been stated, all native birds of prey and other migratory birds are protected and can not be "owned" as a pet.

If you are planning on Falconry, you would have to file your permit paper, then pass your examination with an 80% or better. Once this is done you will have to be sponsored by someone holding a Master class permit. an Apprentice class permit allowing you to keep and maintain 1(per 12-months) of either three types of small bird of prey: American Kestrel, Red-tailed Hawk, or Red-shouldered Hawk.


After practicing with your Apprentice class permit for 2 years then you can obtain a general class permit, allowing you to possess up to three birds of prey of any species that is not on the threatened or endangered list.


That's not necessarily true. Every state regulates falconry differently. I know this because I was going to get a falconry permit but could only find a sponsor for my last year of college, and I knew I was leaving (you have to be sponsored for two years in Oregon too). In California and Oregon, you are only allowed to have Kestrels and RTHs as apprentices, not Red-Shouldered Hawks.

In addition, only some states allow owls to be kept as falconry birds. Owls really aren't feasible to hunt with most of the time, so the regulators know about this loophole and have closed it in some states.
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AzureWolf
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Re: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act confuses me. Help!

Postby AzureWolf » Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:23 pm

:) Yes, I should have mentioned that. Those are the requirements in Florida. I was going by my permit application I am filling out and from my research.

Here is a link that should help if interested in Falconry.

http://www.fws.gov/offices/statelinks.html

The link will help you answer a lot of your questions regarding state regulations. :) Hope it helps.

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