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Great-horned Owls as pets?

Hawks, Eagles, Owls, Osprey etc.

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Tiger_eyes
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Great-horned Owls as pets?

Postby Tiger_eyes » Fri Jan 19, 2007 11:15 pm

Dose anyone know anytihng about great-horned owls as pets? All I really know about them in captivity is that they eat rats and rabbits, and have very strong talons, so you need to wear gloves. Though never a huge bird fan in general, I've always loved red tails, owls, and eagles, as well as vultures. We used to have this speices at camp, but they were released.
"Money'll buy you a good dog, but it won't but the wag of its tail"
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Lasergrl
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Postby Lasergrl » Sat Jan 20, 2007 12:08 am

Trouble is its illegal to have any native raptors or parts in the US. The only thing close is rehabber or being a liscensed falconer, but you can only have red tail, paragrin or kestral, no owls. HOWEVER any non native species to the US is perfectly legal federally. There are lots of species that resemble them. I am not sure on Canada law, I know they differ a little on raptors, so dont know. But anyways thats why there isnt alot of info on their captive care :(
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Postby Ranger » Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:21 pm

I think you can have birds of prey if you get a falconry permit, but they are hard to get even if you are a municipal zoo. I'm not sure why so many raptures are protected, though. It seems like red tailed hawks are all over the place where I live. It's not uncommon for me to see one about every ten miles along the highway, but some days I don't see any. They also seem to be adapting to the city as well.

I once got to handle a great horned owl. He was a real treat. He was well mannered and quite placid.
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Postby prk22 » Sat Feb 17, 2007 12:56 am

There is also a way you can keep them as long as you use them for educational purposes. Our aviary has a few predatory birds, as well as partaking in this handicapped Bald Eagle breeding program.
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roy
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great horned owl

Postby roy » Tue Apr 10, 2007 2:54 pm

I would say they would not make a good pet... ya'll are right.. for one.. its illegal... and they so eat rabbits, mice and skunks are their favorite. :(
They are the only owl that is immune to the skunk spray... or whatever.. doesnt bother them a bit.

I think here its a 500 dollar fine if you get caught w/ any pred. bird.
even a feather.
heres a pic of a great horned owl.. he only suffered a little wing damage after he was caught in a fence.
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Bizzybear
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Postby Bizzybear » Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:09 pm

Are falcons predatory birds? Don't people keep them? (I'm not trying to be argumentative it's just that I love owls and I really wish I could have one.)
sueBear
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Postby sueBear » Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:27 pm

Eurasian Eagle owls are legal in the states without a permit as they are NOT a native species. You would however build a large mew (its like a predatory bird aviary) and have a constant supply of small rodent for them to eat..
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Postby roy » Wed Apr 11, 2007 7:35 pm

yes falcons are a predatory bird... bird of prey.. ( meat eater)
and.. Im not trying to be a butthole.. lol
but why do you want an owl for a pet??
Even the largest of cages... the owl would not be happy.
They live a long time in captivity.. ( zoos)... but usually even those in zoos have something wrong w/ them where they are not able to hunt..
A completely healthy owl is not going to be happy caged its entire life..

IF your really set on this.. you might try an educational permit..??
check w/ the rehabbers in your area.. or your state game warden.
roy
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Barn Owls

Postby roy » Wed Apr 11, 2007 9:44 pm

I'm sorry, I guess I was mistaken... This link never says ( or I didnt see it) where you can buy these... but evidentally they are sold.. and sold for cheap..
If interested.. please read all the info.
http://website.lineone.net/~sheilagre/index.html
Kastrophee
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Postby Kastrophee » Wed Apr 11, 2007 10:23 pm

roy wrote:yes falcons are a predatory bird... bird of prey.. ( meat eater)
and.. Im not trying to be a butthole.. lol
but why do you want an owl for a pet??
Even the largest of cages... the owl would not be happy.
They live a long time in captivity.. ( zoos)... but usually even those in zoos have something wrong w/ them where they are not able to hunt..
A completely healthy owl is not going to be happy caged its entire life..

IF your really set on this.. you might try an educational permit..??
check w/ the rehabbers in your area.. or your state game warden.


True, for most owls and probably other birds of prey they need to stretch their wings. I guess it is possible to let free and teach it to come back to its aviary, kind of like an outside cat that comes home every night...
Though that would take a lot of work...
roy
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Postby roy » Wed Apr 11, 2007 11:22 pm

yeah and i kept researching.. I think that they only breed/sell them in UK.. couldnt find anything abou it in the US>
but somewhere in that link.. was training them to come back to you for food.. did you read that part??
It went on to say.. the owl died! because the owner was only feeding the owl a tiny bit of chicken... to make him returen.. and of course was the owl was returning.. he was STARVING.. the owner did not know he was supposed to keep an accurate weight status on the owl.. The owl soon went down from starvation.. and died!
Birds like that have to maintain a certain weight or they cannot fly.. and go down.. and they do starve to death. Its sad.
Mister Wiseguy
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Postby Mister Wiseguy » Wed Aug 22, 2007 5:48 pm

I hear you can use owls in falconry, but it takes a while to get licensed and you have to start with a red-tailed hawk, iirc.
Nirvana
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Postby Nirvana » Thu Aug 23, 2007 2:58 pm

Trying to get a falconry permit in the US is a pretty major undertaking. You need to find someone to apprentice under for a given amount of time, and you do have to start with a red-tailed hawk (not that that's a bad thing -- red-tailed hawks are great birds!) I think if you're really into raptors, though, falconry is a pretty neat way to go -- it definitely creates an amazing bond between the bird and the handler, and that way the bird gets plenty of exercise as well. (Of course you have to be willing to watch your animal kill another animal, and step in if needed to do the job yourself, so non-hunters are at a bit of a disadvantage.)

I volunteer at a raptor center; we have a number of disabled owls, and one fully healthy one, a CBB Eurasian Eagle Owl. There is at least one breeder in the States, but the birds aren't cheap -- I think around $3000. He doesn't get flown much, if at all, but I don't think he minds too terribly -- unlike the hawks and falcons I think the owls are fairly sedentary birds. Nonetheless, I think if someone wanted to keep one as a pet/companion the best thing to do would probably be to man him (train him to come back to you) so that you could give him flight time ... Otherwise, what's the point? :D

All birds that are flown or worked with must be weighed daily to keep them in that narrow range at which they will be motivated to come back to you for food, but aren't so thin that they become weak and/or stop eating (which they will do if they drop too too low...)

I'm hoping to possibly start working with the EEOW this semester, but we'll see if that happens ... If so I can let any interested parties know how that goes :) Owls aren't like hawks or falcons in that they will not respond to you unless they are partially imprinted on humans.
Mister Wiseguy
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Postby Mister Wiseguy » Thu Aug 23, 2007 3:23 pm

Nirvana wrote:Trying to get a falconry permit in the US is a pretty major undertaking. You need to find someone to apprentice under for a given amount of time, and you do have to start with a red-tailed hawk (not that that's a bad thing -- red-tailed hawks are great birds!) I think if you're really into raptors, though, falconry is a pretty neat way to go -- it definitely creates an amazing bond between the bird and the handler, and that way the bird gets plenty of exercise as well. (Of course you have to be willing to watch your animal kill another animal, and step in if needed to do the job yourself, so non-hunters are at a bit of a disadvantage.)

I volunteer at a raptor center; we have a number of disabled owls, and one fully healthy one, a CBB Eurasian Eagle Owl. There is at least one breeder in the States, but the birds aren't cheap -- I think around $3000. He doesn't get flown much, if at all, but I don't think he minds too terribly -- unlike the hawks and falcons I think the owls are fairly sedentary birds. Nonetheless, I think if someone wanted to keep one as a pet/companion the best thing to do would probably be to man him (train him to come back to you) so that you could give him flight time ... Otherwise, what's the point? :D

All birds that are flown or worked with must be weighed daily to keep them in that narrow range at which they will be motivated to come back to you for food, but aren't so thin that they become weak and/or stop eating (which they will do if they drop too too low...)

I'm hoping to possibly start working with the EEOW this semester, but we'll see if that happens ... If so I can let any interested parties know how that goes :) Owls aren't like hawks or falcons in that they will not respond to you unless they are partially imprinted on humans.


Are snowy owls, and eagle owls native to America?

My bird of choice would be a golden eagle. However, you have to get a master's license, I think.
Nirvana
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Postby Nirvana » Sat Aug 25, 2007 2:56 pm

Snowy owls are native. Can't have those. In addition, I think they are prone to respiratory diseases when they get too far south ... Not sure how they keep the one healthy that they use in the "Harry Potter" movies!

Eagle owls are NOT native, and as far as I know are legal to own without too much special licensing. I'm not sure what you do need; may need a USDA permit or something like that, and it probably varies from state to state. I'm just guessing though. As I said they're pretty expensive though, and they are THE largest owl in the world, so they're a pretty intense bird! I think anyone wanting to get one should have previous owl experience, so you know what to expect ... They're not exactly friendly, affectionate birds, and they have a lot of sharp points!

We have a golden eagle at the facility; she is WONDERFUL. Just a gorgeous, impressive bird. I'll try and remember to snap a pic of her next time I visit her. She's also remarkably calm. However, she also weighs 12 pounds, so thus far none of the students work with her for liability reasons. There's a photograph that circulates the 'net of a golden eagle taking a live fox, if you've ever seen it...

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