PUT EXTRA MONEY IN YOUR POCKET
https://www.ebates.com/r/SYBIL414?eeid=29041

Great-horned Owls as pets?

Hawks, Eagles, Owls, Osprey etc.

Moderators: Ash, TamanduaGirl

Kastrophee
Posts: 109
Joined: Thu Jan 25, 2007 5:02 pm

Postby Kastrophee » Sat Aug 25, 2007 3:13 pm

Predatory birds should only be kept by people that know what they are doing (Experience, ect.), but other then that I think they can make great pets (Though I would never be interested in that)....
Nirvana
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2007 12:35 pm
Location: Northeast US

Postby Nirvana » Sun Aug 26, 2007 2:34 pm

Predatory birds should only be kept by people that know what they are doing (Experience, ect.)


...I think this pretty much applies to any animal :) Though I know what you're getting at; raptors are a lot tougher than many other animals. I don't know if I'd ever call them "pets," but I think they can make great companions for the right person. I think you have to be really, REALLY into raptors to make that commitment, though.
Kastrophee
Posts: 109
Joined: Thu Jan 25, 2007 5:02 pm

Postby Kastrophee » Sun Aug 26, 2007 2:56 pm

You don't need much experience to get a small domestic dog, domestic cat, or rat/hamster/mouse, ect...

All you need to know is what to feed, how often, how much, excercise needs, cage needs, other needs and be commited enough to provide all this till it dies (Hopefully naturally)...

Though a raptor is a LOT tougher to keep, if you want one, start volenteering where they have some. If you get one or not I doubt you will regret this....
Lionsniper
Posts: 140
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:32 pm

great horned owls as pets

Postby Lionsniper » Tue Jul 29, 2008 2:04 pm

I know of a veterinarian who had one as a pet--even would have it wear little hats made for it and it travelled with her everywhere--I was at her office one day and a different great-horned owl landed right on top of my head--I didn't feel I thing--it was so gentle, the landing and all--really neat! IMHO, I believe any creature can make a good pet--love, respect and boundaries, key ingredients. I hope to eventually acquire a non-releaseable owl of some sort in the future.
Nirvana
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2007 12:35 pm
Location: Northeast US

Postby Nirvana » Thu Aug 07, 2008 12:53 pm

Cynthia, I agree with you although I would quibble on semantics ;)

IMO, my personal definition of a "good pet" is an animal whose physical and emotional needs can be met by most people with a relative minimum of effort. Rabbits, for example, would be a "good pet" in my book. Chinchillas are a GREAT pet! :D

A Gaboon viper, by contrast, would fall into the category of something that I would not consider a "good pet" -- simply because it is not a good pet for most people. Most Gaboon vipers for sale come equipped with some of the most potent venom on the planet, making any bites potentially lethal. Even if one is able to find one that has been surgically devenomized by a vet, it's still a fairly tough animal to keep as the owner has to be careful not to overfeed, and must keep temperature and humidity within reasonable parameters to avoid illness. I think these are wonderful animals, and some people can certainly own and enjoy them -- and I think they have the right to. Nonetheless, although I have met some absolutely wonderful Gaboons I would never tell someone that they make a "good pet."

Owls I don't think make "good pets" for the vast majority of people simply because they require so much attention, both to keep them "tame" (don't like to use that word with raptors -- the proper term is "manned," because they're never really tame) and to very closely monitor their weight, which has a direct effect on both health and temperament. That doesn't mean that they can't make wonderful companions for experienced keepers; I just don't know if I could ever call an owl a "good pet," even when paired with the proper owner.

But, I get what you're saying :) What kind of owl did your vet friend have? Do you know what kind of owl you're going to get, or is this something for the distant future? :)
Lionsniper
Posts: 140
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:32 pm

Postby Lionsniper » Thu Aug 07, 2008 2:07 pm

True enough, I understand your valid points. Sometimes I write to quickly and leaves things wide open for interpretation. What I meant was that most creatures can be tamed or are very willing to have a relationship with a human. I've been around an extremely docile Gaboon viper when I worked as a zookeeper but I never underestimated it as I didn't have any experience with vipers. I've known so many people with various exotic pets and have read volumes on the subject. I was taking for granted that anyone on this board is a fellow exotic owner, but I shouldn't make those assumptions. Of course, you have to be responsible and totally dedicated to these type of creatures. I've seen first hand how "tame" Great Horned Owls can be in the right circumstances. Disabled wildlife can make good pets--I have an intact male raccoon with some brain damage that is totally docile with me--long story on that one, but he was given to me at 1 year of age. I believe raptors that are used in programs because they have been injured adjust to captivity quite well--and non-injured, as I worked with a fully flighted Harris Hawk that was a very nice bird. I would imagine falconers have quite a bond with their birds as well. I'm working on getting my hacking tower built for fledgling hawks and owls--I hope to acquire an injured Great Horned Owl after I've more experience with raptors.
Nirvana
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2007 12:35 pm
Location: Northeast US

Postby Nirvana » Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:53 pm

The Great Horned we had at the facility where I volunteered last year really never tamed down that well -- he would do OK at education programs, but you could tell he was freaked out, and he never ate off the glove. Then again, nobody ever really worked with him one-on-one that much. I wish you luck with your owl if you are able to get one!

I'm hoping to maybe put in for a non-releaseable owl at the school I'm at this year, IF I can get all the proper permits, etc. ... If not, though, I'm going to look for a Eurasian Eagle Owl eventually -- as far as I know I don't need any permits in my state to own one. I worked with the one at our facility and he was amazing ... He required a huge amount of patience, but man what a cool bird! :)

I think it's also possible to own Spectacled Owls without a permit, but as far as I know there are only a tiny handful of folks breeding them...
Lionsniper
Posts: 140
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:32 pm

Postby Lionsniper » Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:47 pm

I've seen those Eurasians for sale in Animal Finder's Guide--I think maybe Spectacled as well. Good luck to you in your owl endeavors as well! Where in the Northeast are you--I am a native Jersey girl living in Florida now.

Return to “Raptors, Hawks, Eagles, Owls etc.”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest