PUT EXTRA MONEY IN YOUR POCKET
https://www.ebates.com/r/SYBIL414?eeid=29041

Considering a ball python lots of questions

Snakes, Lizards, Salamanders, Turtles, Frogs, etc.

Moderators: Ash, TamanduaGirl

linseylou
Posts: 216
Joined: Sat Nov 02, 2013 9:18 am
Contact:

Considering a ball python lots of questions

Postby linseylou » Tue Aug 16, 2016 9:33 am

I'm considering getting a ball python,but ive never owned a reptile....what advice do you have for me,and can i see some examples of enclosures for them? Tia :)
You are forever responsible for what you've tamed, responsible pet ownership starts with you.
I share my life with 4 red foxes,2 raccoons, a couple human children, my hubby, dogs,and a snake
User avatar
Ash
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 7844
Joined: Fri Oct 08, 2010 11:38 am
Location: Utah

Re: Considering a ball python lots of questions

Postby Ash » Fri Aug 19, 2016 12:54 am

Hi! Wanted to let you know I saw this, but I have to run, so can't answer right now. :P But I'll get back to you as soon as I get back online!
3 red fox, 4 pectinata iguanas, nile monitor, BW tegu, sailfin dragon, leachie gecko, 6 snakes, 2 salamanders, 3 tarantulas
User avatar
Ash
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 7844
Joined: Fri Oct 08, 2010 11:38 am
Location: Utah

Re: Considering a ball python lots of questions

Postby Ash » Mon Aug 22, 2016 3:13 am

For the actual cage there are several options. I personally use plastic tubs with holes drilled in the sides since I converted over to a snake rack. This works best, in my opinion, since it keeps in the heat and humidity very well.

You can also use the traditional tanks, or terrariums, that are available at pet stores. If you go this route, you will definitely have a prettier cage, but you will have to work a little harder to make sure the heat and humidity are where they should be. So you'll need to insulate it. The screen tops let out all the heat and moisture. Lots of people cover the top with a moist towel.

They need temperatures in the low to mid 80s (I do 84), and a hotspot around 90 degrees. This is what I have found to be best for my balls. You can achieve this with a heat lamp or an under-tank heater. Both can work well, but I prefer offering them belly heat. You will need to monitor the temperature with an actual thermometer (not the gauges they sell at the store; they are notorious for malfunctioning and giving inaccurate readings) or a temperature gun. If you want to be safe, you can even plug the heat source into a thermostat, which is highly recommended. That way you don't have to worry about adjusting the temperatures. The thermostat will do it for you.

For substrate I use aspen or paper towels. You can also use cypress as well, though I have not done this personally.

Be sure to give your ball python a nice hide with some sphagnum moss inside. The sphagnum moss retains moisture well, so will keep the hide humid for them. Some owners offer multiple hides, but it is not necessary. When I used tanks, I offered multiple decorative hides.

And of course have a water dish of some kind in there. I recommend it be something large enough for the ball python to bask in. Ball pythons will drink from their water dish. It is great for keeping up the humidity in the cage as well. A ball python will not generally sit in its water dish unless something is wrong. "Wrong" could mean the cage is too dry, the temperature is too high, or it has mites. So if you ever see your ball python sitting in its water dish, do a double-check on the husbandry.

It's also good to mist your ball python's cage every now and again depending on how the humidity is holding up inside. A warm, damp towel on the top of a tank may provide enough. Use a hygrometer to measure the humidity level (once again, the gauges you see at the pet store are unreliable; I got one from Home Depot for cheap and it works great).

So a list of things you need before getting a ball python...

1) Tub or tank (if tank, you will need a towel to insulate the top)
2) Heat source
3) Thermometer or temperature gun
4) Thermostat
5) Substrate
6) Hides (may want to also buy sphagnum moss)
7) Water source
8) Hygrometer
9) Spray bottle for misting
10) Ball python ;)

Ball pythons are what I call a "plop" snake. They like to sit in one spot, lol. A ball python is secretive and will hide. If it does not feel comfortable, it won't settle down in a hiding spot. There are times when they get get curious (especially if there's some sort of new smell) and will cruise around their cage, tongue-flicking everything, but generally a ball python that is out and about is either uncomfortable, on the hunt for some food, or thermoregulating (making itself comfortable again).

They have very cute eyes, and their periscoping is adorable and funny. I find them very personable, well-mannered snakes, and I definitely would recommend them as pets. Lots of times they will fall asleep on you if they get comfortable. One of my ball pythons fell asleep on my sister's head once, lol.
3 red fox, 4 pectinata iguanas, nile monitor, BW tegu, sailfin dragon, leachie gecko, 6 snakes, 2 salamanders, 3 tarantulas

Return to “Herptiles - REPTILES and amphibians”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest