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Brush Tailed Bettongs

Wallabies, kangaroos, Sugar Gliders, Possums, Quolls, etc.

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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby TamanduaGirl » Thu Feb 06, 2014 4:06 am

It's almost done! I just need to do the conclusion. It'll be basically the same as the "can they survive in Oregon" part but I can summarize a bit more from the other sections to make it longer and more inclusive. I may add a bit about me at the end or in the cover letter about my experience but it's not really a consideration as the point is their worry about what happens if joe smoe down the street gets one once it's listed non-controled.

Need to actually do all the citations, also some editing mostly formatting and maybe some spinning of copied parts, though it's not like it's a college paper or being published but it might still be best. But basically it's mostly done. YAY! Ad hopefully I can get the breeder's letter soon too as I thinkthat would be a good bonus.

Edited: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1spO1 ... sp=sharing
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby Ash » Fri Feb 07, 2014 7:47 pm

I read it through again, and it looks very good. :) It flows very well and is very scientific. I only saw a few typos, so maybe go back through and double-check everything before submitting it. But all else looked great to me. I thought the part where you compared them to native species was very useful and interesting. They are also a lot bigger than I thought they were. I think it's really cute that they will fall asleep in presenter's arms, or hop right inside a pouch!

Citations are a pain, so good luck getting through those. Can't wait to read the conclusion once you're done with it though, and see what the breeder sends.

I like their "squats." They look like bird nests on the ground almost.
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby TamanduaGirl » Fri Feb 07, 2014 10:04 pm

Thank you. I've been through it a few times since posting it so may have fixed most of them by now but it's easy for me to miss things so will go over it some more too. I had 6 pages of citations then changed the formatting and have 5 now but same amount. I may add a few more in text citations too though it will be things already in the references list.

The comparing species was required by them. I think it's to ensure no one would have a native or prohibited species and claim it's a bettong if bettongs get allowed.

Conclusion
The Brush Tail Bettong has no history of escape and survival outside of its natural range. It is critically endangered in its natural habitat because of invasive species like fox, cats and dogs which are native or domestically local to Oregon. Similar native species like coyotes, pine marten, and bobcats further decrease the odds of freed Bettongs surviving in the Oregon wild. Bettong simply are not equipped to deal with our native wildlife and succumb easily to their predation.

No region of Oregon provides all that the Bettong would need to survive for more than a season or two. The High Desert is most like its natural habitat but it, like many other parts of Oregon, gets too cold for survival. The Coast is the most temperate region but is still cooler than the Bettong’s native habitat and it is too wet and humid to keep Bettongs healthy and alive for very long. While an escaped Bettong would easily succumb to pneumonia due to temperatures and humidity, they do not carry any exotic diseases which could be passed on to wildlife. This is because they are all born and bred in the USA and Australia no longer allows export of their wildlife.

The Brush Tailed Bettong is unlike any native species in Oregon and bears little in common with any prohibited species. Bettongs are nonaggressive with other species and keep excessively large territories which, should any escapes happen, would keep any impact they may have to native species virtually nonexistent. They would not out compete any native species, which live in much denser populations, propagate more quickly and eat different foods. Their large territories would also drastically limit any impact they would have on the environment and what little impact they have may even be beneficial.

For these reasons the Brush Tailed Bettong should be classified as non-controlled because it is not an invasion risk and carries with it no health threats to native wild life.


Reread after pasting it here and maybe I should add again that they are easily captured. It is only briefly mentioned earlier on and might help to remind them?

I still may add a little about the Author either at the end or in the cover letter so they know who's petitioning them, that I have experience with wallabies, deer and tamandua already.

I love the squats. I'll have to give mine a lot of grass hay to see if it will build any for it's self.
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby TamanduaGirl » Sun Feb 09, 2014 4:16 am

Bettong videos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cr3cWUoLAhs#t=13 (bettong and a mara)

OMG too cute: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RB9LZYLudLw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky2HTkZQjeg

more natural tail carrying http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5qq8U5XQA8

News Story on BB's http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyxpFivnE3c

Eastern Bettong but nice little documentary http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zT_omYEJbXA

Um, maybe don't tease him with the food if you don't want him mad http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCYhO7NSzYo
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby TamanduaGirl » Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:35 pm

Finally got the petition sent off. I had a lot going on for awhile there so it got put off awhile. One step that wasn't clear by the regs is it will go through a wildlife integrity panel then if they say it is low threat then the director can list it non-controled but if thought to be higher risk then it will go through the board. It more or less said that but didn't mention the panel. So that could take some time but I'm excited now, the ball is now out of my court and in motion. I can't really imagine they will find anything I missed to make them higher risk.

PS: I am now FB friends with someone who has a pet Bettong. Her cute photos are killing me :)
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby Gryffindor » Tue Apr 01, 2014 5:57 am

I love bettongs! I have them on my dream list but wasn't sure if I'd ever be able to get any considering how rare they are. I probably won't be able to get one for a long time but it's nice knowing there's at least one breeder in the US. Hope there continues to be in the future.

Can I ask how expensive they are?

And since you know so much about laws, do you know whether they're legal in Florida? I'm assuming they are, probably a Class III..
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby TamanduaGirl » Tue Apr 01, 2014 1:39 pm

Their prices tend to be similar to fennec foxes seen them as low as $800 but around $1,500+ is more common. There's some breeders that donate them for free to qualifying USDA exhibitors or established breeders as well. Not all bottle feed though and bottle fed ones will make better pets so that's worth paying more for.

Yes they would be class 3 in FL as they are the opposite of here and anything not listed is automatically in class 3. Here everything not listed is auto-banned, hence my needing to petition.
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby TamanduaGirl » Tue Apr 01, 2014 6:25 pm

Okay so the panel meets twice a year, in late spring and early fall. Lucky me I've not missed spring it will be sometime in May. He said I was right and the code says the director can class as non-controlled if he wants but in history he never has and always send it to panel. At least I don't have to wait till fall.
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby Nicophorus » Tue Apr 01, 2014 9:10 pm

TamanduaGirl wrote:Here everything not listed is auto-banned.


wow that's harsh
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby Ash » Wed Apr 02, 2014 3:21 am

Ooh, this is super exciting! I'm glad it'll be reviewed in May--would have been such a pain if you had to wait until Fall! Keep us posted, and let us know when the date is.

Utah does the same--anything not listed is automatically banned. Doesn't leave room for... anything, lol.
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby TamanduaGirl » Sat May 24, 2014 1:38 am

The panel will recommend to the Commission that it be classified as a non-controlled species. At this time it is on the agenda to be presented to the Commission at their Sept. Commission meeting.

Really nice job on answering the questions.

I will let you know in September if the commission agreed with our recommendation


The government red tape is slower than I anticipated. You'd think if they both only meet twice a year they could have the panel meet before the commission so things can be dealt with right away, but that would be too efficient :P At least things are looking good.

So barring the commission being unreasonable I can get one next year :)
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby otterpop » Sat May 24, 2014 3:45 am

It looks promising--

Maybe the Panel has already made the decision for them to be non-controlled, only now the Commission gets to look over the panel's data they have on hand.

For my case, there was considerable attention regarding the risk of otters getting loose and causing any form of disruption or negative impact to the ecology and such, being that they are generalists as far as prey and habitats are concerned. I figure these days tolerance for such risk is very low, not counting any negative publicity there would be for ODFW versus the "concerned" public once an escaped otter caused reportable damage after allowing them to be ruled non-controlled. Apart from the fact that even native wild otters can be regarded as local pests in some situations.
The outcome in that case was almost certain, and expected by myself once reality sunk in before I heard of the results.

Looks as if bettongs in general are fragile creatures, and seem not to be a high risk for just about anything, and can be easily distingiushed from other animals. Not like exotic otters that resemble, well native otters.

The Commission has adopted a more precise set of criteria for future species considerations, that may have been used to determine Bettong listing.

If an escaped animal cannot be easily recovered (or me being realistic- exterminated), (a smart otter, or hard to locate tropical amphibian,) then survivalbility is key. Even persecuted otters seem to manage to survive all but complete environmental destruction, because they are versatile and able to travel considerable distances in seeking more suitable territory- as long as they aren't trapped to extinction. Oregon statewide is fine country for any species of otter, except perhaps the Giant Otter. If a species is strictly tropical or very dependent upon narrow natural conditions, then survivalbility is low. So I think Bettongs were a much better candidate for a non-controlled listing. Being that the panel has recomended that listing, then hopefully all the Commission needs to do is agree. It would be a plus if the Commission determines the entire genera or family as non-controlled.

At the March Commission meeting, they adopted a more precise set of criteria for future species considerations, that may be used for Bettongs. Also there was some mention to have the Integrity panel consider in the future CITIES listings or endangered status in a natural range, which may be reflected upon any difficulty of acquiring of certain species and limiting the potential number of that species kept in private captivity in Oregon.

Oh, yeah- more good luck!
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby TamanduaGirl » Sat May 24, 2014 2:13 pm

Thank you!

So they decided the fact a species in endangered is a plus as far as being listed non-controlled? That's good. I made sure to cover that as well as the fact that as far as I am aware no one can get one at this time unless they are USDA licensed.

I'm more optimistic than I may have sounded. I just think it's silly the panel meets after the commission when it's things passed on from the panel the commission is ruling on, but that's just how government tends to be. It's a bit amusing really. Just means I have to wait longer.

Reading between the lines I get the feeling he thinks it's a pretty sure thing. Hopefully the petition covers all the commission needs for their new criteria. I thought about petitioning the whole family but then I would have had to go into details for all species. Seems like the whole family should be non-controlled so that would be nice but I don't know if they will without a petition for it.
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby Ash » Sun May 25, 2014 3:09 am

This is great news! They sounded very positive about it, in their own neutral way. ;)

Shame you have to wait until September to find out though! I imagine it will just be passed with a simple vote by the board.

That's how it is in Utah, at least. The panel/committee meets, makes their decision, and then presents it to the board. When I was at the UT DWR's board meeting for Fable, everything the committee recommended during the whole time I was there was passed--almost without question. The board asked some questions out of curiosity regarding the different issues, but no one disagreed with the committee since they had done all the research already.

I think you have a very strong case, and with the committee behind you, I think you'll definitely be able to get a bettong next year. You wrote a strong, persuasive piece--and the facts you presented only support getting them listed as non-controlled.
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Re: Brush Tailed Bettongs

Postby otterpop » Sun May 25, 2014 4:27 pm

About them considering endangered status, that was just my guess that such species would be harder to get established in Oregon from captive exotics held by private people. But I figure that the Comission, Director and Integrity Panel would really take that factor in consideration, hopefully I am not just being optimistic.

This idea of considering CITES Red Book and endangered status was brought up during the wildlife integrity rules discussion for future species listings.

The particular criteria change recomended by the Integrity Panel was to expand on the Commission's evaluation factors of petitioned species (the first set of critera in classification requests), dividing "Feasibility" and "Cost" from "g" into separate "g" and "h".

And also adding "types of disease or parasites could be passed on to native wildlife" to the Director's risk criteria (the second set of criteria in classification requests, the particular set of criteria that I used for my own petition)
Those show up in here: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/agency/commi ... 0Rules.pdf

Another thing about "feasibility and cost" I guess it is rather easier to find and recapture an escaped Giraffe, Hippo or Rhino than it is is to find a loose small mammal, so that must be why those such large animals are non-controlled, apart from the high price of acquisison.

Yes, It looked as if the Commission had agreed to everything the Panel had recomended about the requested otters, amphibians and reptiles (and the criteria changes), thus my optimisum about the bettongs being recomended as non-contolled (if that is right).

Which is what I hope.

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