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Thinking About a Horse. . .at least Someday ;)

Zebra, Horse, Onager , Donkey, Kiang, Quagga Anything in this family

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FoxyLoxy
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Thinking About a Horse. . .at least Someday ;)

Postby FoxyLoxy » Wed Jun 03, 2009 7:15 pm

Being your stereotypical girl, I like horses. I think they're cute.
Anyhow, I've been thinking about it and I've decided that I want to have a horse/pony when I'm on my own and once I've learned more about horse care.

Question is, what kind of horse should I have? I'd like one on the small side (though I like Shires and Clydesdales, they eat a LOT! :shock: ), so probably a pony, but still rideable (so no minis). I'd only ride for fun, and then just very casually.
I'm a very affectionate person, so if there's a breed of horse that enjoys cuddles I'm all over it :D . Sociableness would be good- by the time I get my pony (if I'm lucky enough to get one) my sister will probably have a couple of little girls (I can always hope ;) ) which will, of course, come over to Aunt Lyssa's house just to pet the pony.

Also- how smart are horses? And how willing are they to show off their smarts? My friend has a pair of rabbits which are incredibly smart and clever but are too lazy to show it XD. So how hard is it to train a horse to come or stay, etc.? I'd like one on the smarter side, but not so smart it's constantly bored with me.
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Postby Lasergrl » Wed Jun 03, 2009 9:44 pm

I recommend highlt a mammoth donkey for riding and cuddling. Donkeys are alot more cuddly and affectionate then horses. With horse personal space can be a safety issue. Alot of times if you allow a horse to get cuddley with you they then take advantage. With donkeys its just they way they are. They like to cuddle and lean but usually dont take it as a sign that they are in charge if you allow it. I have a horse and a donkey and they donkey is way my favorite. She is a hair too small to ride and she has a founder issue so I cant ride her but she is broke to and a kid could ride her. I'd like to sell my horse and get a mammoth donket to ride.

Norwegian Fjords might be a breed to look into. If I had the money I would get one for sure. I got the haflinger instead because I couldnt afford the fjord and it was a huge mistake (anyone want to buy a hothead haflinger?).
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Postby FoxyLoxy » Wed Jun 03, 2009 10:43 pm

Thanks for the tip, laser! I completely forgot about donkeys!
Maybe I could get a mule? Keep some of the donkey niceness but have more of the horsey look?
Question though: are donkeys as stubborn as rumored? I am a stubborn person myself, but only to a point.
Foxes love gingerbread men, cheese, and Tom Thumbs, if fairy tales can be believed.
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Postby Lasergrl » Wed Jun 03, 2009 10:52 pm

no, donkeys are not stubborn, they just require a different approach then horses. Horses look to people as the herd leader and a well trained horse will follow its riders directions to a fault. Donkeys are just too smart for that, If they think a situation is dangerous they often wont listen. Thats why they are ridden down the grand canyon. A horse might freak out and good bye! A donkey will always keep itself safe. They are trained a little different then horses are too wich is why some may think they are stubborn, because they arent training them correctly.
Yes, mules are an excellent choice too! I just preffer the donkey temperment and looks so much I wouldnt want to ruin the genetics making it half horse ;)
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Postby FoxyLoxy » Wed Jun 03, 2009 11:12 pm

Haha!
I've been looking at mules and donkeys and it's really opened up a lot of options for me. A mule sounds about perfect to me- they're horsey enough to be cute, but enough donkey so that I can hug them and tell them so. I also like the roundness and softness of donkey features, and I adore long ears!

Query: If my equine will only be running on grass or dirt, will he/she/it need to wear shoes? Also, if the answer is no, can a horse owner clip the hooves by him/herself? I'm guessing no. . .

I'm excited! All I have to do now is take one more year of high school, take four years of college, and then wait until I have the money and space for him/her! That's only five years down the road! I can be optimistic, can't I?
Foxes love gingerbread men, cheese, and Tom Thumbs, if fairy tales can be believed.
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Postby Lasergrl » Thu Jun 04, 2009 12:21 am

No, most equines do not need shoes. They need shoes only if ridden on pavement or hard ground alot. My horse and donkey are barefoot. You can trim them yourself if taught. I have tried and am not good at it. I pay $20 for a hoof trim every 6-8 weeks. My donkey have hoof problems and need a professional though. Donkeys and mules feet will grow very fast if they are on grass. Their bodies arent meant to ingest alot of nutrition, they are made for the desert. If they have very rich pasture they can get obese fast and can founder.
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Postby FoxyLoxy » Thu Jun 04, 2009 1:24 am

Excellent! I'm excited already!
I'm thinking I might have Irish moss (Sagina subulata) instead of grass for a large part of my future property- I'm allergic to grass to begin with, and I think moss is far prettier, easier to maintain (doesn't really grow higher than a quarter inch or so), and it's sooooo good on the feet :mrgreen: . I don't know what future owners will do, but for me I think it will work excellently.

What kind of 'tricks' will I be able to teach her, theoretically? (leaning more towards mares- for obvious reasons :? ) I'd like to teach "come", "stay", and maybe "say hello" (giving permission to snuggle someone new), but I don't really know much about horse training.
Foxes love gingerbread men, cheese, and Tom Thumbs, if fairy tales can be believed.
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Postby dachshundlove » Tue Jul 21, 2009 11:01 pm

I have 2 horses, an arab mare and a qh gelding. I must say my mare is my favorite by a long shot. She is extremely intelligent, has personality, and can be affectionate, though I would say the gelding is more affectionate. I too like horses on the smaller side, mine are just barely at 15 hands. I was a first time horse owner when I got my arab and I guess I was lucky because it has been a fabulous experience with no regrets. Yes horses are flight animals and want to run from danger but part of your learning to ride is to be able to spot those potential situations and how to diffuse it before it happens. And horses can be taught to overcome their fear of things. We can trail ride both of our horses bareback, in their halters with just the single lead line hooked under the chin. Yes they are both very well trained but experience and lots of riding is what got them to this point. Even when I do use gear I just use a hackamore. If you really want a horse I say go for it!
But you may not get the right one right away, it may take e few tries.
No I do not recommend trimming the hooves yourself. A good farrier is just as important as a good vet. Sometimes the horse needs a special type of trim if a correction is needed. Farriers can also spot a potential problem in the making. One thing for sure though, having horses ain't cheap! Pasture, hay, grain, wormers, any needed supplements, riding gear, farrier, vet, teeth floating, shots, fly masks, boots, and fly spray, winter blankets if needed, stall bedding. I think I covered it all! Lots of work too. Feed them, groom them, clean stalls, and then of course finding time to ride them. I enjoy it though. I'd rather clean the stalls than my house!
2 horses, 2 rabbits, 1 goat, 18 dogs, 5 fish, 1 secret.
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Postby Lasergrl » Tue Jul 21, 2009 11:16 pm

it sounds like riding may not even be a priority, if thats so, maybe consider a mini horse or donkey for a first time animal. They seem very adept at trick training!
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Postby Trefoil » Wed Jul 22, 2009 8:23 pm

Before you get your horse or donkey,you might want to find out if they can graze on irish moss. You really don't want to founder your animal or buy one that has been foundered. In my experience a male horse is generally more playful than a mare.
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Postby FoxyLoxy » Fri Jul 24, 2009 5:01 am

Thanks for the support and advice, everyone!
I really would like to have a larger breed of horse/donkey/mule so that I can ride it as well as spoil it with love ;) . I'm thinking I might get a Mammoth Donkey after all. I finally got to see one in person at Mount Vernon (which is really cool, BTW) and I'm just in love with their adorable looks. However, I don't know too much about them, so any info on donkeys, gentle horse breeds, or other options would be very welcome!
Foxes love gingerbread men, cheese, and Tom Thumbs, if fairy tales can be believed.
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Postby BB » Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:58 am

I've always wanted a donkey but you really have to take in to consideration the life span. Donkeys can live to 40 years (around here anyway). Few blocks away the people got a donkey and a horse (for a companion) and their block has pretty much changed in four month from being green grass to bare dirt with some weeds. Keeping a horse costs a lot of money too. And donkeys do need interaction as well. Donkeys are really born to serve man, they like to be given tasks and getting worked.
I guess if you are looking for a donkey there are donkey-sanctuaries around which have donkeys looking for a good home.
Like I said, I'd love one too, but I don't think I have enough time for one so I'd rather go to my neighbor and pat his Donkey!
You could also look into horse-minding(people who got horses but haven't got enough time to ride them or are afraid of them and need someone to look after them..)
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Postby Lasergrl » Fri Jul 24, 2009 1:47 pm

yeah, my donkey is broke to ride and drive and she HATES doing anything other then eating or being pet. :lol: I might have been a donkey in a past life.
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Postby BB » Fri Jul 24, 2009 5:59 pm

:lol: :lol: yeah, I guess there always be something against the norm....
Looks like your donkey got you well trained :D
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Postby Lasergrl » Fri Jul 24, 2009 7:13 pm

from what I can tell many donkeys dont like doing work. At least over here they dont. Really I never knew a donkey could give a "dirty look" untill molly. She is too small to ride so I dont care anyways.

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