NOTICE:

THIS BOARD WILL BE DOWN FOR A LITTLE WHILE. NOT SURE WHEN. I NEED TO DO UPDATES ON IT.
I WILL GIVE EVERYONE AMPLE TIME WHEN THIS WILL HAPPEN.

IT COULD TAKE ANYWHERE FROM AN HOUR OR MORE TO A DAY. LOTS OF WORK INVOLVED IN IT.
I MIGHT CHANGE THE THEME TOO. SO IF YOU COME ON WITH A DIFFERENT LOOK, YOU ARE AT THE RIGHT PLACE....LOL

Emo

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Re: Emo

Postby TamanduaGirl » Thu Apr 10, 2014 11:41 pm

You don't need approval from anyone. You just need a dog TRAINED to do something that helps with your DISABILITY. This is federal.

Businesses can't ask about your disability. They can only ask if your dog is a service dog and what it is trained to do. You can be vague, say it alerts me rather than saying it alerts me when I need to get to the john because I'm about to have an IBS issue.

Faking a service dog is a crime. This is where proof come in as if someone calls the cops on you for bringing your dog somewhere or whatever then the law needs proof to know who's wrong; you for faking or the business for calling the cops and denying you.

The main thing would be if your condition counts as disabled.
This is kind of a cool thing to help a person with that: http://servicedogcentral.org/content/fi ... iceDog.pdf
The chart doesn't exactly address alert dogs though. As a person couldn't alert you to seizures or IBS but maybe a dog could and if they could that could certainly improve an impaired part of your life.

And the actual legal definition: http://servicedogcentral.org/content/node/331

The definition very specifically includes mental impairment which could include depression though I'm not sure what a dog could be trained to do for that but I'm probably just not being creative enough. Anxiety for sure as I gave some examples of how that has worked for some.
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Re: Emo

Postby RabbleFox » Fri Apr 11, 2014 3:53 pm

I'm actually considering making my next!dog a SD to mitigate my depression and anxiety. I'm having a hard time admitting that my depression is disabling but it basically is, unfortunately.

Merlin, my current dog, is my Emotional Service Dog (ESA) and he helps tremendously at home but isn't really cut out to be a SD due to his suspicion of all men folk.

If my next dog works out, he will be trained to stuck his cold nose into my head to alert me to panic attacks, stand between me and strangers of need be, and to sit on my lap or near me during bus rides or some such should I begin to panic in public transportation or in class. Those are just a few things a dog could do for you. The actual task training for those commands isn't too difficult but the leash manners and the service dog attitude are tough to perfect, especially for younger dogs. A SD is a piece of medical equipment. Medical equipment doesn't pull on lead, sniff aimlessly, pee indoors, bark needlessly, growl, freak out when it sees other dogs, etc. That's the hard part!

Best of luck with Emo. I love those snow photos. Bounce bounce!
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Re: Emo

Postby Juska » Fri Apr 11, 2014 9:13 pm

Talys wrote:You can have an trained animal approved to aid in depression and IBS? How did I not hear about this? There was a certification site I visited a few months back that provided the certification and licensing for companion animals in therapy work. I wonder if that would be in accordance with PA's laws or wouldn't be enough.


TG is right, you don't need "certification" for it. And any "agency" or any other company that claims they offer service dog training for anything like that, and charges you money, is most likely a fraud.

The trouble I have with "proving" my disability is that my anxiety/panic attacks/depression/IBS can hit at any moment. It's not something I wake up with every single morning and deal with, though many of those things come into play throughout the day, and it's not something I can replicate for a doctor to see. It happens at the most inopportune moments. Though almost everyone who's known me for at least a little bit has witnessed what happens when it hits.

But it does affect me when it happens, especially my sleep. When I have a panic attack at night my heart races (sometimes up to 120 BPM), as well as my mind, and sleep never comes. I've stayed up for days because of it. Driving is the biggest problem. Driving anywhere can turn into a serious problem for me in a split second, whether I know it's coming or not. It's terrible.

But the day I took Emo with me last week, my stomach did start to hurt a few times, but it didn't escalate into a full-blown attack or having to pull over and go to the bathroom. She kept my attention the whole ride there that day, and back the next morning. Maybe that's what her training could entail; keep my mind/subconscious occupied so panic doesn't set in.
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Re: Emo

Postby TamanduaGirl » Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:15 am

Ah yes I didn't express myself as well as I meant too(at least Juska understood but I can see I said it pretty poorly). When I talked about proof I definitely didn't mean a certificate. Some people will carry a doctors note around with them but none of that is required. But if something does escalate then you need to be able to prove you weren't faking to the authorities if they think you might be, even if it's just like, call my doctor and he'll verify.
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Re: Emo

Postby Juska » Wed Jan 21, 2015 9:06 pm

Image

Mom took this photo of the dogs and I a few days ago.
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Re: Emo

Postby Ash » Thu Jan 22, 2015 12:46 am

That is such a cute picture!
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Re: Emo

Postby just_curious » Sun Feb 01, 2015 10:08 pm

Juska wrote: and he even fed her some of his dessert brownies from the table, haha.


You seem quite nice and a loving pet owner and I don't wanna be "that guy" but..well it's a brownie isn't it? With chocolate? Unless it's something different of course, since you seem so casual about it I'm guessing I got lost somewhere and missed some information...

Still, what a pretty dog, seems happy and healthy and because of you I may try to get my puppy over at a childrens hospital to brighten someone's day!
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Re: Emo

Postby TamanduaGirl » Mon Feb 02, 2015 12:51 am

Chocolate is dose dependent and it's not like cyanide or something where tiny bits here and there continue to build up over time. It passes through. A brownie has practically nothing in it. A chihuahua I had once pigged out on a Halloween candy bowl of kisses and pb cups when we were out. She was fine. Didn't even get the runs. The issue is really pretty much with dark chocolate as it's more concentrated with the actual problem, the coco powder it's self.

If you want to know: the theobromine and caffeine speed up their heart and too much is kind of like a speed overdose but a little brownie or ice cream isn't a problem from the chocolate
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Re: Emo

Postby Juska » Mon Feb 02, 2015 2:45 pm

It's incredibly hard for a dog, even a small one as TG mentioned, to get dangerously ill or die from eating milk or even dark chocolate. My dog Emo would have to eat over a pound of milk chocolate to be considered mild/moderately at risk of toxicity. About nine ounces of dark. Yes it's less for a smaller dog, but that's still a lot.

The most dangerous types are dry powdered cocoa and baking chocolate. Which are so bitter and/or are in a powdered consistency that there's almost no way a dog would eat it anyway, if they got a chance to get into it. So unless a dog has zero inhibitions about swallowing a large bar of baker's chocolate or whole canister of cocoa powder that was just lying out on the counter, they're pretty much safe, or at least not at risk of them getting sick.
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Re: Emo

Postby just_curious » Mon Feb 02, 2015 9:04 pm

Oh, okay thats good to know. I wasn't sure if a fox's digestive system and whatnott was different from a dog's. My puppy decided to take it upon herself and eat some easter candy, but the difference was it was an entire chocolate bunny and she is really small (cocker spaniel) She's quite a trouble maker and got the entire family freaking out because we didn't know how much chocolate would kill her. It WAS milk (thank goodness) but she was sick (threw up) but five minutes later she was running around again eager to play tug-o-war!! Sometimes I think she's a bit of a dummy..xD
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Re: Emo

Postby Juska » Mon Feb 02, 2015 9:15 pm

There's a toxicity meter that measures it by the dog's weight, what kind of chocolate and how much right here: http://www.petmd.com/dog/chocolate-toxicity
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Re: Emo

Postby TamanduaGirl » Mon Feb 02, 2015 10:13 pm

That meter is a good idea. People just think in terms of yes/no rather than amounts mattering. It's was funny how on a show I watch one time the guy gave his dog a couple bites of brownie and people freaked out. So then in a later episode they had him tell the dog he couldn't have a bite of brownie cuz of the chocolate. People's hearts are in the right place but it's not as terrible for a small bite of something chocolate as people have been lead to believe.

PS your dog puking from the chocolate bunny was probably more from the fats than anything else. Some dogs are more sensitive to that than others. Hyzzie doesn't like it but if she ate some chocolate she'd probably have a bout of pacratitise from the fat but like I said my old dog of similar size had no effects from it.
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Re: Emo

Postby Juska » Sat Feb 21, 2015 6:25 pm

Reposting from Facebook :roll:

Gave Emo a much-needed bath. Her seborrhea (skin gets yellow and big flakes show up in the fur) was getting bad on her back again, the only place she has it. Boy does her fur get oily, too. Didn't use conditioner this time, she was ready to get out after shampooing and the conditioner I have, while very softening, takes forever to wash out once it's worked in. It's some kind of all-natural, organic, lavender with no preservatives low fat thing, I don't know. It's made to sell to people who are nuts for organic/"natural" stuff. I bought it because it was on clearance and I liked the smell.

The shampoo I use is specifically medicated for seborrhea, and is anti-parasitic as well: SynergyLabs VF Clinical Care Antiseborrheic Medicated Shampoo. Best part is, you can get a bottle online for about $12, and you can use it on yourself as well, especially to treat dandruff. I've used it personally and it does work. It keeps Emo's seborrhea at bay for about a month or so before it flares up again. I bought one bottle and it's lasted many, many washes of both dogs.

Might give her the "princess" treatment: clean ears, de-shed her butt fluff, comb her tail until it's beautiful and brush her curls so they're nice and shiny. Clipped her nails about two weeks ago so she doesn't need that again just yet. It's weird, even if she's professionally groomed and her hair blown dry, her curls stay. They always come back. Most dogs that have her curly type of coat lose their waves and their fur goes pin straight with that treatment, but not hers. Curls and waves for days.
Emo is about as much of a "dog" as dogs can get (if that makes sense), doesn't like pampering or wearing pretty things, but once in a while I can get her to tolerate it enough to make her look nice, haha.
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Re: Emo

Postby Juska » Sun Mar 29, 2015 8:09 pm

So here's a weird one.

Bathed her yesterday before we had company over, and while I was washing her, giving her a thorough rub-down to check for old lady bumps and anything else, I felt some weird bumps on the underside of her tail. Like, lots of them. At the base of her tail on the underside. At first I freaked and thought they were ticks (That many ticks? What was I thinking? lol), but yeah no ticks, not on my baby. Then I thought it might be poop which was more plausible given the area it was in.

Well I got her turned around in the tub and got a halfway decent look, and it turns out to be big, crusty skin chunks. Then a light went off in my head: she once in a while gets these crazy itchy moments where she tries very hard to turn around and lick/chew her rear end but I can't tell where she's aiming for, because she's a big dog and can't reach. Maybe that spot is the cause of that?

Anyway, I finished washing her, gently exfoliated the seborrhea on her back; I was thinking maybe the tail spot is that flaring up as well, but I just never noticed it until now. But after she was totally dry I carefully brushed the debris out of here, it was fairly loose in the hair on the tail, and it's all cleaned up now. The skin on the tail looked fine and there is definitely no sign of hair loss. There was no blood or signs of infection as far as I could see, so I don't think it was a wound. So I don't know what it is besides a patch of skin that is affected by her skin problems, that I sorely overlooked for a long time (sorry Emo).

If anyone has experienced this with their dog and knows what it is I'd like to hear your experience as well. I'm sure it was just some nasty old skin that needed to come off but who knows. I can't find any pictures on Google that match what I saw, I didn't take photos as it wasn't alarming enough to me to document.
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