PUT EXTRA MONEY IN YOUR POCKET.. https://www.ebates.com/r/SYBIL414?eeid=29041 FREE TO USE .. YOU WILL GET $25.00 TO START)

Fur and skin color terms

Health, Medical or behavior problems with all animals.

Moderators: minervasden, Ash, hecate, TamanduaGirl

User avatar
TamanduaGirl
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 10491
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:42 pm
Location: Oregon, USA
Contact:

Fur and skin color terms

Postby TamanduaGirl » Sun Dec 09, 2012 6:07 pm

The subject comes up a lot and it's confusing, even to me, as a lot of wrong info gets out there.

There's this, which sounds like it might be right.
http://vetherppath.hubpages.com/hub/Und ... erminology

Lots to think about and digest. Seems lots of confusion and even debate on meanings.
User avatar
TamanduaGirl
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 10491
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:42 pm
Location: Oregon, USA
Contact:

Re: Fur and skin color terms

Postby TamanduaGirl » Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:07 pm

So where it's been common to say albino leave the orange behind that's not quite true after all. Orange albinos are just a different type of albino called aeumelanism.

aeumelanism - where only eumelanin production is blocked.

In humans, there are two pigments. Eumelanin is brown to black and pheomelanin is rusty or even orange or red. They travel along a similar cascade when being formed but differ in the amount of sulfur in the final melanin compound. Any disruption along the cascade can cause a form of albinism. Some albinos have red hair because they have a gene that is faulty for the formation of eumelanin, so they are really only eumelanistic albinos(aeumelanism).

LEUKISM (LEUCISM)- medically defined this is a defect in the skin, not the pigment cells. There are other derangements of pigment that can cause a whitening effect, but they are not classical leukism. Classical leukism is caused by a faulty gene, or set of genes, that causes the skin to be unable to support pigment cells.

Because it is a skin mutation and not a pigment supply issue the eyes are not effected.

Any white animals with pigmented eyes are leukistic? NO. Particularly in those animals where their color or percieved color comes from keratin structures like hair or feathers. There are other mutations out there where the pigment cells are working but the (in the case of mammals for example) melanocytes are prevented from injecting their melanosomes into hair shafts. This causes white coats, but pigmented skin. Some white haired horses are an example of this. They may have black skin, but white hair. They are not leukistic. Other animals have this kind of situation too and it can arise as a mutation in a population. Birds may also have a condition like this where they are really normal as far a pigment production, but not in terms of deposition in the feathers.
User avatar
Ash
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 7991
Joined: Fri Oct 08, 2010 11:38 am
Location: Utah

Re: Fur and skin color terms

Postby Ash » Mon Dec 10, 2012 11:27 am

Interesting read. Thanks for posting this, I found it very informative. Couldn't understand lots of it since I'm not familiar with many of the terms used, but still very cool to read about. This is a subject I really want to understand.
3 red fox, 4 pectinata iguanas, nile monitor, BW tegu, sailfin dragon, leachie gecko, 6 snakes, salamander, 3 tarantulas
User avatar
Juska
Posts: 2204
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 10:08 am
Location: Pennsylvania, US

Re: Fur and skin color terms

Postby Juska » Mon Dec 10, 2012 11:36 am

I like the idea of the "misinformation super highway". I find that highly amusing.

"...the misinformation super highway is full of people that do not do the proper research and do not fully understand the subject they are writing about. Some in the misinformation super highway's drunk lane (abbreviated 'wikipedia') do much more than confuse the issues, they actually write things that are incorrect and when it is corrected, change it back the the incorrect information..."

Also it's good to know that when mammals are "albino", it is because of a lack of melanin, whereas for a reptile to be truly albino, it requires the lack of all three: melanin, drosopterins and pteridines, because they are multipigmented animals.

So, in reading this, albinism is a lack of pigment cells, and leukism is a defect in the skin that does not support pigment cells. Am I correct in these definitions?
Pet parent of Emo the border collie mix, Conte the schnoodle and Namira the harlequin cat!
User avatar
sarajeku
Assistant
Assistant
Posts: 1664
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 8:11 am

Re: Fur and skin color terms

Postby sarajeku » Mon Dec 10, 2012 12:32 pm

Some in the misinformation super highway's drunk lane (abbreviated 'wikipedia') do much more than confuse the issues, they actually write things that are incorrect and when it is corrected, change it back the the incorrect information..


:lol: That's the best thing I've read all day.
Image
User avatar
TamanduaGirl
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 10491
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:42 pm
Location: Oregon, USA
Contact:

Re: Fur and skin color terms

Postby TamanduaGirl » Mon Dec 10, 2012 2:19 pm

Juska wrote:So, in reading this, albinism is a lack of pigment cells, and leukism is a defect in the skin that does not support pigment cells. Am I correct in these definitions?


Yep. So in the end they have almost the same effect on appearance but for different reasons. Something like the eyes still having color while being white all over can be a sign it's leucism but not always.
User avatar
TamanduaGirl
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 10491
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:42 pm
Location: Oregon, USA
Contact:

Re: Fur and skin color terms

Postby TamanduaGirl » Sun Dec 30, 2018 6:05 pm

I thought of this old thread because someone posted some "piebald" bats today. 2 had pigment free skin but brown fur which makes me think it's probably medically leukism. The third had a pigment free torso only mostly missing fur though that fur it did have was blond. With the fur missing opens the possibility it was from injury(only one photo of it's back so don't know it it was front side too) or a type of mosaicism, which most call piebald, so that one may be basically right, if we assume the hairloss is not related to the coloration.

I didn't say anything on the post. It's kind of pointless to bring up. I just find it interesting and wish it was a bit easier to get the actual condition's name.
User avatar
GitaBooks
Posts: 268
Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2015 4:48 pm
Location: USA

Re: Fur and skin color terms

Postby GitaBooks » Wed Jan 02, 2019 2:30 am

Thanks for sharing this!
I'm going to school for animal genetics (with a specific interest in coloration and other mutations in those kept in captivity), so I love to read accurate information. So much out there just isn't accurate.

Return to “HEALTH/MEDICAL/BEHAVIOR”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest