PUT EXTRA MONEY IN YOUR POCKET
https://www.ebates.com/r/SYBIL414?eeid=29041

TIGER & LION CARE MANUALS

Tiger, lion, cougar, leopard, anything cheetah size or larger

Moderators: Ash, TamanduaGirl

kaylalk
Posts: 243
Joined: Tue Sep 07, 2010 2:56 pm
Contact:

Re: TIGER & LION CARE MANUALS

Postby kaylalk » Sun Dec 04, 2011 7:10 pm

Thank you for posting this!! Interesting. I will have to read through these.
Lionsniper
Posts: 140
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:32 pm

Re: TIGER & LION CARE MANUALS

Postby Lionsniper » Wed Dec 28, 2011 11:45 am

Thanks for posting these manuals, Mary, quite comprehensive on the tigers, should be interesting. I looked at the Canid Manual, are you aware of anything specific to coyote behavior as I have had the opportunity to care for 2 altered adults that are kept by a rehabber. I looked on the internet, found some behavior info and then contacted a wackjob by mistake, so it seems people aren't willing to share their info/experience if they have any at all. :nogif:
User avatar
TamanduaGirl
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 10416
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:42 pm
Location: Oregon, USA
Contact:

Re: TIGER & LION CARE MANUALS

Postby TamanduaGirl » Wed Dec 28, 2011 4:35 pm

I can try poking around later but there doesn't seem to be a whole lot. Dinka on here has them but she's real busy so you might not get a timely reply.

Maybe try these people http://www.camarillowildliferehabilitat ... yotes.html I can't say if they'll be crazy or not, but it's worth a try. I would think long as you make it clear you are working with a rehab and not in competition(not in the same are some are territorial) with them they would be willing to help.

viewtopic.php?f=68&t=8805&p=79125#p79125
Lionsniper
Posts: 140
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:32 pm

Re: TIGER & LION CARE MANUALS

Postby Lionsniper » Wed Dec 28, 2011 6:02 pm

Thank you. I will try and look at their site tomorrow, thank goodness they are not in OK, met a real winner off their site, contacted her and she reported me thinking I had illegal coyotes on my property, people anymore, I swear. My emails were clear, oh well. I would have contacted Dinka but I need a perspective of wild behavior, I may be wrong but I believe Dinka raised hers and they would not exhibit behavior such as I am experiencing, a newbie to their pack, so the rehabber could not help me either since she raised them from pups. But, in the meantime, I let them teach me, I have to go in with them to clean and feed but over time I have been accepted, no more threat posture from the male, he is the dominant one, not the female. But I am a researcher and like to glean info from other's experiences or read about them.
User avatar
TamanduaGirl
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 10416
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:42 pm
Location: Oregon, USA
Contact:

Re: TIGER & LION CARE MANUALS

Postby TamanduaGirl » Wed Dec 28, 2011 6:14 pm

Actually there are several people listed at the bottom of the rehab site and I'm sure they must get adults sometimes too but no way to know if they keep any adults like that without asking.

Yeah Dinka raises them for pets.
Lionsniper
Posts: 140
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:32 pm

Re: TIGER & LION CARE MANUALS

Postby Lionsniper » Thu Dec 29, 2011 4:24 pm

Interesting that the base of the prepared Nebraska diet is horsemeat. I think Mazuri makes a prepared felidae diet as well. I've noticed the big cats that were fed a combination of beef, venison and some chicken were more healthier overall than those that were fed horsemeat and chicken. The cats eating the horsemeat, their stools were black and tarry, not well formed. I think someone had said that the horsemeat was too high in phosphates or something, a 2y tigress died due to liver/kidney failure, can't remember which now as I had left the facility and she died shortly thereafter. I know that beef is more expensive than horse, but........................
User avatar
TamanduaGirl
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 10416
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:42 pm
Location: Oregon, USA
Contact:

Re: TIGER & LION CARE MANUALS

Postby TamanduaGirl » Thu Dec 29, 2011 7:18 pm

Generally the redder the meat the higher the phosphorus. More fat content means less phos

Horsemeat had similar levels of protein (21.1 vs 21.0 or 21.1%) and lower levels of fat (6.0 vs 14.1 or 16.1%) compared with beef or pork, respectively.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2882581/

More interesting bits there as well. They said there's no big difference in mineral content though in my experience comparing different beef the lower the fat the higher the phos as there's no phos in the fat.

You can compare to other meats here http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

I'd think a rounded diet could include horse meat but generally a carnivore diet should not be just one kind of meat. Variety is healthy.
Lionsniper
Posts: 140
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:32 pm

Re: TIGER & LION CARE MANUALS

Postby Lionsniper » Fri Dec 30, 2011 10:55 am

Thanks for the links. Also in that Nebraska diet are horse by-products which is key to that diet, the innards of the horse, not just the flesh. They talked about the horse bone also in one of those links. I would just replicate what a lion or tiger or leopard eat naturally in the wild, don't understand why some folks don't feed the whole carcass, even bits of it, I am sure the slaughterhouse where I would go and pick up the meat, they just throw away the innards or maybe there were some smart folks who did use it as this guy serviced quite a few of the big cat community. The one sanc I worked at, I don't believe those cats ever ate horsemeat (at least I know I never fed out horsemeat in the 3 years I was there) and the one leopard died at 26 versus the facility I worked at that fed only horsemeat, no innards, no bone, and only chicken and their leopard died at 11 years old. It states horsemeat has lower levels of fat, yet the cats eating the horsemeat (that I referenced) are obese. This could be because they are overfed, lack of adequate exercise, all contributing to early death, but big cat owners are notorious for lying about their cat's weight, always wanting the biggest cat and the cat pays for this. Captive big cats should live into their late 20's.

Return to “Large Exotic Cats”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest