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Mackenzie Valley Wolf

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Splashstorm
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Re: Mackenzie Valley Wolf

Postby Splashstorm » Fri Oct 19, 2012 2:48 pm

And then there are the 4 species of wolf:
...Gray
...Himalayan
...Indian
...Eastern
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Re: Mackenzie Valley Wolf

Postby caninesrock » Fri Oct 19, 2012 3:05 pm

Splashstorm wrote:And then there are the 4 species of wolf:
...Gray
...Himalayan
...Indian
...Eastern

That is incorrect.

There are only 3 wolf species:
Red Wolf(Canis rufus)
Ethiopin Wolf(Canis simensis)
Gray Wolf(Canis lupus)

Himalayan Wolf, Indian Wolf, and Eastern Wolf are subspecies of the Gray Wolf. However, some scientists do debate that the Eastern Wolf may actually be more closely related to Red wolves than Gray Wolves.

Source:
http://www.canids.org/species/index.htm
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Re: Mackenzie Valley Wolf

Postby Splashstorm » Fri Oct 19, 2012 4:32 pm

caninesrock wrote:
Splashstorm wrote:And then there are the 4 species of wolf:
...Gray
...Himalayan
...Indian
...Eastern

That is incorrect.

There are only 3 wolf species:
Red Wolf(Canis rufus)
Ethiopin Wolf(Canis simensis)
Gray Wolf(Canis lupus)

Himalayan Wolf, Indian Wolf, and Eastern Wolf are subspecies of the Gray Wolf. However, some scientists do debate that the Eastern Wolf may actually be more closely related to Red wolves than Gray Wolves.

Source:
http://www.canids.org/species/index.htm


The red wolf is no longer considered it's own species and canis simensis is a jackal, not a wolf.
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Re: Mackenzie Valley Wolf

Postby caninesrock » Fri Oct 19, 2012 5:43 pm

The Ethiopian Wolf used to be considered a jackal,but has recently been reclassified as a wolf. The Red Wolf used to be classified as a subspecies of gray wolf but is now considered it's own species, though some scientists debate that it may just be a hybrid between gray wolves and coyotes.

Yes,the Eastern Wolf, Himalayan Wolf, and Indian Wolf are sometimes thought to be seperate species by some scientists,but currently,most scientists classify them as subspecies of gray wolf.


The term Himalayan wolf (referred to by the provisional name "Canis himalayensis") has been suggested by several Indian biologists for recognition as a critically endangered canid species, distinct from Canis lupus. In its morphological features, social and reproductive behavior, the Himalayan wolf resembles the Tibetan wolf, Canis lupus chanco.[1]

However, the IUCN Wolf Specialist Group has not taken a position regarding this issue. The editors of Mammal Species of the World consider the small population to be Tibetan wolves, a subspecies of the gray wolf.[2]


The Indian wolf (Canis lupus pallipes) is a gray wolf subspecies inhabiting South and south-western Asia.[1]


Some experts have suggested at least some C. lupus pallipes populations be re-classified a canid species distinct from C. lupus. Other experts believe it may be the wolf subspecies from which the domestic dog evolved, pointing to its small size and comparatively docile behaviour, although they are also known man-eaters. While their populations are stable or increasing in some countries, in others they may be endangered. C. l. pallipes has been featured in different roles in different west Asian cultures; treated as vermin or menace in some times and places, respected and protected in others.


Eastern Wolf was recently recognized as a potentially distinct species, but closely related to red wolf.[5] Some authors disagree[6] and the status as a distinct species is not official. Now, many international and government organizations carry out scientific research for their taxonomy and genetics to answer this question, as well as researching their ecology and influence on the ecosystem.


Above quotes are from Wikipedia,but they all link to other sources.


Also,in addition to Canids.org, the International Wolf Center also says that the only species of wolf are Red, Gray, and Ethiopian:
http://www.wolf.org/wolves/learn/basic/ ... cation.asp
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Re: Mackenzie Valley Wolf

Postby Splashstorm » Fri Oct 19, 2012 6:24 pm

I think that site is a little outdated. I noticed they still include the dog as it's own separate species. :/

And thanks for the Ethiopian wolf info. I had no idea they were considered true wolves.

Also, the red wolf has just recently been changed to canis lupus. Before they were canis rufus. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_wolf

The red wolf (Canis lupus rufus,[1] formerly Canis rufus) is a North American canid which once roamed throughout the Southeastern United States.[4]

Source: ^ a b c Wozencraft, W. C. (2005). "Order Carnivora". In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.

About the Himalayan and Indian wolves:
"...long thought to be part of a subspecies of gray wolf called the Tibetan wolf (Canis lupus chanco). However, mtDNA analysis suggests that they should instead be classified as a distinct species – the Himalayan wolf (Canis himalayensis). Along with the Indian wolf, Himalayan wolves may represent an ancient line of wolves predating even Canis lupus. Himalayan and Indian wolves are probably the oldest living lineages of any wolf species in the world, having been isolated on the Indian subcontinent for over 800,000 years. They are so distinct, in fact, that they do not share any genetic markers with gray wolves or domestic dogs.

Originally thought to be the same gray wolf subspecies as the Iranian wolf (Canis lupus pallipes), the Indian wolf has recently been designated as a separate and distinct species (Canis indica). Recent mtDNA analysis shows that the Indian wolf’s ancestors were isolated on the Indian subcontinent over 800,000 years ago, and then split to form the modern Indian wolf and Himalayan wolf some 400,000 years ago. Though the Indian wolf’s range overlaps greatly with its closest relative, the Himalayan wolf, almost no interbreeding has occurred because of behavioral differences."
http://www.graywolfconservation.com/Inf ... wolves.htm

Eastern wolves:
This site here calls them canis lycaon instead of "canis lupus lycaon": http://www.sbaa.ca/projects.asp?cn=314

Also:

A recent study of mitochondrial DNA has suggested that the recovered wolf population is not genetically representative of the historic population. We present microsatellite genotype data on three historic samples and compare them with extant populations, and interpret published genetic data to show that the pre-recovery population was admixed over a century ago by eastern wolf (Canis lycaon) and grey wolf (Canis lupus) hybridization. The DNA profiles of the historic samples are similar to those of extant animals in the region, suggesting that the current Great Lakes wolves are representative of the historic population.

http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/ ... /101.short

and:

Recent genetic data indicate that the eastern wolf is not a subspecies of the gray wolf (Canis lupus), but is a North American wolf more similar to the red wolf (C. rufus) and closely related to the coyote (C. latrans). The eastern wolf has been proposed as a separate species, C. lycaon. ... We assessed the relationships of animals in the park by using DNA profiles that comprised the genotype from 17 autosomal and 4 Y-linked microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial DNA control region. These profiles were used to establish maternity, paternity, and kin relationships for 102 wolves that were studied from 24 packs over a 12-year period. Genetic data do not support the hypothesis that a pack comprises an unrelated breeding pair and their offspring. There is evidence of frequent pack splitting, pack fusion, and adoption. Some unrelated individuals in the packs were identified as immigrants into the park. We found high levels of genetic structuring between the Tweed wolves to the southeast and the Algonquin Park wolves (RST = 0.114). Lower levels of genetic differentiation with animals to the north and west (RST = 0.057 and RST = 0.036) and high genetic diversity suggest that park animals are not an island population but the southern part of a larger metapopulation of C. lycaon.

http://www.asmjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1 ... lCode=mamm
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Re: Mackenzie Valley Wolf

Postby caninesrock » Fri Oct 19, 2012 6:43 pm

What site are you referring to being outdated? Wikipedia, Canids.org, or the International Wolf Conservation Center? Wolf Conservation Center and Canids.org are not outdated. They don't list the domestic dog not because they consider it a seperate species,but because they are both sites for listing wild canids and their conservation status. The domestic dog is not a wild canid,even if it is classified as a subspecies of gray wolf. Wolf Conservation Center has been updated pretty recently as they mention the conserversy over whether or not the Eastern Wolf should be considered a Gray Wolf subspecies or it's own subspecies on one of their "Wolves of the World" pages and that's a fairly recent conserversy.
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Re: Mackenzie Valley Wolf

Postby Splashstorm » Sat Oct 20, 2012 10:06 pm

Ohh okay thanks for clearing that up.
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